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BREAKING: Italy cruise ship Costa Concordia aground near Giglio

At least six people are reported dead after a cruise ship carrying more than 4,000 people ran aground off Italy.

The Costa Concordia hit a sandbar on Friday evening near the island of Giglio and listed about 20 degrees, after which people tried to reach land in lifeboats or by swimming.

The last 50 people on board are being evacuated by helicopter in a "worsening" situation.

Italians, Germans, French and British were among the 3,200 passengers.

In addition, 1,000 crew were on board the vessel.

One thousand passengers were Italian, with 500 Germans and 160 French.

The Costa Concordia had sailed earlier on Friday from Civitavecchia port near Rome for a Mediterranean cruise, due to dock in Marseille after calling at ports in Sicily, Sardinia and Spain.

'Groaning noise'

Passengers were eating dinner on Friday evening, when they heard a loud bang, and were told that the ship had suffered electrical problems, one passenger told Italy's Ansa news agency.

"We were having supper when the lights suddenly went out, we heard a boom and a groaning noise, and all the cutlery fell on the floor," said Luciano Castro.

The 290-metre (950 ft) vessel ran aground, starting taking in water and listing by 20 degrees, the local coast guard said.

Orders were given to abandon ship, Deodato Ordona, a cabin steward on the Costa Concordia, told the BBC.

"We announced a general emergency and took passengers to muster stations," he said.

"But it is hard to launch the lifeboats, so they moved to the right side of the ship, and they could launch."

Elderly passengers were crying, said Mr Ordona, adding that he and some others jumped into the sea and swam roughly 400 metres to reach land.

Rescued passengers are being accommodated in hotels, schools and a church on Giglio, a resort island 25km (18 miles) off Italy's western coast.

Costa Crociera, the company which owns the ship, said it could not yet say what had caused the accident.

"The gradual listing of the ship made the evacuation extremely difficult," a statement said. "The position of the ship, which is worsening, is making more difficult the last part of the evacuation.

"We'd like to express our deepest gratitude to the coastguard and other emergency services, including the authorities and citizens of the island of Giglio, who did their best in saving and helping the passengers and crew."

Were you on the cruise ship? Do you have friends and family on the ship? Are you on the island of Giglio? Did you witness the accident? You can send your comments to the BBC using the form below:

Send your pictures and videos to yourpics@bbc.co.uk or text them to 61124 (UK) or +44 7624 800 100 (International). If you have a large file you can upload here.

by Anonymousreply 27801/30/2013

.

by Anonymousreply 101/14/2012

Shit. Major disaster. I think the Phoenicians charted those waters; how could they hit a reef there?

by Anonymousreply 201/14/2012

Damn.

CostaConcordia was their biggest, newest, most advanced ship when I left the industry back at the end of 2006.

That's probably the worst accident a major cruise ship has had since NCL's SS Norway's boilers exploded in 2003.

Shame.

by Anonymousreply 301/14/2012

HOly SHit, check out the photos. It didn't just run aground. It is on its side.

Greek owned?

by Anonymousreply 401/14/2012

Italian, although Carnival Cruise Line is its parent company.

by Anonymousreply 501/14/2012

VOTN, what did you do in the industry?

I was a singer/dancer in the 80's on several lines, then an Activities Manager/Cruise Director at Royal Caribbean in 2004/2006

by Anonymousreply 601/14/2012

This is why I hate cruise ships.

This and the rats.

And pirates.

Those poor people.

by Anonymousreply 701/14/2012

[quote]VOTN, what did you do in the industry?

I was a travel agent for a big internet-based agency. I was actually pretty good at it, but based on all the changes the industry has gone through over the past five years, and the fact that, no matter how much fun I had, it wasn't intellectually stimulating, I got out. Which I don't regret.

I do miss it sometimes.

by Anonymousreply 801/14/2012

How the hell does a cruise ship run aground?

Don't they have people telling them where the water ends?

by Anonymousreply 901/14/2012

Looks like the underwater sonar system didn't work as it should have. Or someone abandoned his duties for a great blowjob.

by Anonymousreply 1001/14/2012

I knew one of these oversized, top-heavy shoeboxes would meet a fate like this. It was only a matter of time.

I hope that the casualty list doesn't get larger.

by Anonymousreply 1101/14/2012

The AP story -- no, I'm not linking, but I saw it on the NYT site -- has interviews with American passengers talking about having to crawl almost vertically up hallways in the listing ship to get make their way out. Also quoted a passenger saying that an Argentinian couple with a 2-year-old were frantically trying to get the daughter to safety.

Sounds horrific.

by Anonymousreply 1201/14/2012

This is OUR (aka THIS generation's) TITANIC!!!

by Anonymousreply 1301/14/2012

The Americans I heard interviewed said the crew all panicked and made things worse...

by Anonymousreply 1401/14/2012

The "crew" is made up of mostly untrained kids from various economically-challenged countries who've signed up for a year or more of what amounts to endentured servitude away from their families. They all have posts they're trained to go to in an emergency, and it all looks good during drills, but things never go that way in real life.

by Anonymousreply 1501/14/2012

Well they are Italian, R14. Useless drama queens.

by Anonymousreply 1601/14/2012

[quote]This is OUR (aka THIS generation's) TITANIC!!!

If anything, it's a real-life Poseidon Adventure, because there was speculation on the news that some people may be trapped in submerged sections of the ship.

by Anonymousreply 1701/14/2012

For what it's worth:

The unlucky vessel was the setting for the first part of Godard's "Socialisme," and featured some really nasty Russian mafia, dyspeptic French academics and Patti Smith wandering around, clutching a guitar.

All that and the shipwreck could almost convince me that the old Maestro was on to something.

by Anonymousreply 1801/14/2012

[quote]The AP story -- no, I'm not linking, but I saw it on the NYT site -- has interviews with American passengers talking about having to crawl almost vertically up hallways in the listing ship to get make their way out.

PANTIES! What else do I need?

by Anonymousreply 1901/14/2012

3 bodies recovered, 70 still missing. So much for "minor incident."

by Anonymousreply 2001/14/2012

The sea was so blue that day.

by Anonymousreply 2101/14/2012

Of course with all those thousands of people, many of them old and disabled, I'll bet they are probably used to a death rate of 10-20 per voyage. These big cruise ships probably all have morgues.

by Anonymousreply 2201/14/2012

How that many fail safe navigation systems failed is beyond belief.

There had to be something happen to completely disconnect the bridge from control of the ship. It may have coasted into the reef.

The other option would be if they did it on purpose.

Inspector Clouseau should be called immediately.

by Anonymousreply 2401/14/2012

[quote]Don't they have people telling them where the water ends?

It could have been worse than just hiting a sandbar. They could have fallen off the edge.

by Anonymousreply 2501/14/2012

[quote]These big cruise ships probably all have morgues.

This has never crossed my mind before. Do they have fully-equipped morgues on cruise ships?

by Anonymousreply 2601/14/2012

I don't quite get this. First of all, it looks like they're only a few hundred feet from shore.

by Anonymousreply 2701/14/2012

VOTN, which is it - R6 or R8? or both?

by Anonymousreply 2801/14/2012

[quote]Do they have fully-equipped morgues on cruise ships?

Yes.

by Anonymousreply 2901/14/2012

[quote]This has never crossed my mind before. Do they have fully-equipped morgues on cruise ships?

Yes. It's kind of grim, but people do die on cruise ships, and they need somewhere to store the remains until the ship makes port again.

Repatriating remains is also incredibly expensive.

by Anonymousreply 3001/14/2012

[quote]Do they have fully-equipped morgues on cruise ships?

More likely, a separate section in the hold refrigerator

by Anonymousreply 3101/14/2012

R22, is ridiculous and inaccurate.

R26, is stupid and a dolt.

by Anonymousreply 3201/14/2012

I hope Julie had time to grab her bag of coke before it got wet.

by Anonymousreply 3301/14/2012

[quote]I don't quite get this. First of all, it looks like they're only a few hundred feet from shore.

"Elderly passengers were crying, said Mr Ordona, adding that he and some others jumped into the sea and swam roughly 400 metres to reach land."

Hell-o?

by Anonymousreply 3401/14/2012

[quote]VOTN, which is it - [R6] or [R8]? or both?

I'm R8. I believe R6 is the one who asked me what I did.

by Anonymousreply 3501/14/2012

Cruise ships do have morgues and coroners have notice cruise ship deaths. Of course, they don't hold dead bodies on board all the time, but take them off at the next port. And who know how many burials at sea they do....

by Anonymousreply 3601/14/2012

The MS Estonia was a relatively recent disaster and far worse than this one. The stories told by the (few) survivors are absolutely horrifying.

by Anonymousreply 3701/14/2012

It rather looks like the ship made a mistake entering the rather small harbor at Giglio. The harbor has breakwaters on both sides, which you can see in most pictures. Now that the Captain has been arrested, we may get some facts.

It looked to me, from a few pictures, like some of the passengers were being evacuated to Port Ercole on the Monte Argentario peninsula. That part of the Maremma is a little barren in hospitals, until you get to Civitavecchia.

The waters are more treacherous than they seem. Giglio and the nearby island Giannutri are basically just big rocks.

by Anonymousreply 3801/14/2012

They have computers telling them where the shallow water is.

by Anonymousreply 3901/14/2012

It's an ugly ship.

by Anonymousreply 4001/14/2012

In acqua sono molto magri lady.

by Anonymousreply 4101/14/2012

God R37. I don't remember that at all.

It said most of the 800+ dead were never recovered.

by Anonymousreply 4201/14/2012

The Concordia's hull was transferred to Costa from Carnival Cruise Line. I've been on a few of CCL's sister ships, and while they're not much to look at from the outside, they're actually kind of nice from the inside.

You want ugly? I present NCL's Norwegian Epic.

by Anonymousreply 4301/14/2012

I hate cruise ships....

by Anonymousreply 4401/14/2012

Better pictures from the Daily Mail, of all places...

by Anonymousreply 4501/14/2012

Look at the size of the rock embedded in the side of the ship.

Thanks for the link, R45.

by Anonymousreply 4601/14/2012

Are their any passenger cabins below the water level anymore? I kind of remember that not being allowed for safety reasons anymore. What would there be that low in the ship?

by Anonymousreply 4701/14/2012

Crew quarters and mechanical stuff like the engine room.

by Anonymousreply 4801/14/2012

Will there be a "Cast 'The Costa Concordia' Movie" thread? If so, I propose Jack Scalia as the captain - haven't seen him in years.

by Anonymousreply 4901/14/2012

[quote]the 52-year-old captain, from Naples, had abandoned the ship at around 11.30pm local time – about an hour after it struck a rocky outcrop and started taking in water – while the last passengers were not taken to safety until 3am yesterday morning.

Wow, he is so fired.

by Anonymousreply 5001/14/2012

Just wondering what the point would be for the captain to stay aboard after the point where he couldn't do anything.

by Anonymousreply 5101/14/2012

[quote]For what it's worth: The unlucky vessel was the setting for the first part of Godard's "Socialisme," and featured some really nasty Russian mafia, dyspeptic French academics and Patti Smith wandering around, clutching a guitar. All that and the shipwreck could almost convince me that the old Maestro was on to something.

Interesting. Thanks.

by Anonymousreply 5201/14/2012

[quote]Wow, he is so fired.

He's been arrested. Possible manslaughter charges.

by Anonymousreply 5301/14/2012

[quote]Just wondering what the point would be for the captain to stay aboard after the point where he couldn't do anything.

A captain does not leave his ship before everyone else on board. He should be ashamed of himself.

by Anonymousreply 5401/14/2012

"A captain does not leave his ship before everyone else on board. "

Still, how does it help that the captain is hanging from the side (for instance) if there's nothing more he can do, no way communicate? How will he know everyone is out? Should he hang there a week to make sure everyone is accounted for?

by Anonymousreply 5501/14/2012

I don't know why anyone would go on one of these cruises. Google crime on cruise ships and you'll be shocked. I was roped into going on one and it was horrible. It had a floating shopping mall atmosphere. Granted I knew it wasn't my thing from the start but I thought I would give in to this type of vacation once.

by Anonymousreply 5601/14/2012

R55, when you consider that he was off the ship at 11:30p while the last passenger was taken off at 3 am, it's pretty obvious he didn't give a shit. We're talking almost four hours between the time he was off the ship and the last passenger. It shows he made no effort. His crew were of no help either. They handled it badly from the get-go.

by Anonymousreply 5701/14/2012

R56, I agree, I find cruises horrible and horrendous.

They prey on the unexpecting, the susceptible, the naive, the unknowing, those who do not research and read, and those lacking critical thinking and analysis skills.

And there is no explanation for those few who take repeated cruises. They are a sub-group.

by Anonymousreply 5801/14/2012

"There's got to be a morning after....."

by Anonymousreply 5901/14/2012

The classic and hilarious take down of cruises by David Foster Wallace (PDF):

by Anonymousreply 6001/14/2012

[quote]That's probably the worst accident a major cruise ship has had since NCL's SS Norway's boilers exploded in 2003.

Well... probably the worst since 2007. The Sea Diamond struck a rock and sank off Santorini in 2007, with two fatalities - two French passengers.

by Anonymousreply 6101/14/2012

[quote]I was roped into going on one and it was horrible. It had a floating shopping mall atmosphere. Granted I knew it wasn't my thing from the start but I thought I would give in to this type of vacation once.

*Shrug*

Some people like 'em. I thought I would hate it until I went on my first one. It's certainly not my preferred way to travel, but in the right mindset, you can enjoy yourself.

And when I was doing it for a living, I always said that I would much rather people take a cruise and maybe accidentally be exposed to a new culture and a different point of view than stay home and never try anything even remotely different.

by Anonymousreply 6201/14/2012

[quote]Just wondering what the point would be for the captain to stay aboard after the point where he couldn't do anything.

Because he got them into this mess.

by Anonymousreply 6301/14/2012

I hesitate asking this question for obvious reasons, but I'm really curious: Has anyone been on the Queen Mary 2? What was it like?

by Anonymousreply 6401/14/2012

Has Kate Gosselin issued a statement?

by Anonymousreply 6501/14/2012

How long of a cruise was it?

It doesn't seem it would take that long to coast through the Tyrrhenian Sea according to the map.

by Anonymousreply 6601/14/2012

Thank goodness it wasn't a gay cruise. Can you imagine fighting over who'd be Stella Stevens or Shelley Winters?

by Anonymousreply 6701/14/2012

Now y'all will have NOTHING to worry about on my ship, the Beauty of the Sea. All of our safety measures are in place, and our third-world servants speak enough English. To make you feel better, we're setting up the ice cream bar EARLY and adding two extra chocolate fountains!

Come sail with meeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

by Anonymousreply 6801/14/2012

There's got to be a morning after....

by Anonymousreply 6901/14/2012

In the water I'm a very skinny lady.

by Anonymousreply 7001/14/2012

are there sharks in those waters? I imagine people swimming to the rocks in that cold water,just like that movie "the reef". The sharks nabbing them as they try to get up on the rocks.

by Anonymousreply 7101/14/2012

[quote]How long of a cruise was it?

Seven nights, Western Mediterranean, round-trip Civitavecchia.

One thing though, most cruise ships don't go much faster than 20 knots at cruising speed.

by Anonymousreply 7201/14/2012

I feel bad for those poor Southeast Asian people who, away from their families, were toiling on the ship. Really sad if any of them were killed in the accident.

by Anonymousreply 7301/14/2012

If anything, the officers were likely to be Italian, and the crew were probably majority Eastern European.

I wish I was seeing booms out of try to contain the diesel fuel, but I'm not in any of the pictures I'm seeing and that worries me.

You could probably get a hell of a discount on Costa Atlantica, their ship that sails on Caribbean cruises out of Miami during the winter.

by Anonymousreply 7401/14/2012

They found a newlywed S. Korean couple after 24 hours. Hope they rescue more.

by Anonymousreply 7501/14/2012

Something is really wrong if you're running a cruise ship with thousands of passengers with incompetent personnel.

by Anonymousreply 7601/14/2012

MS Estonia sinking animation. Its amazing so many people survived considering how quickly it went down.

by Anonymousreply 7701/14/2012

R64, I was on the QM2 last January. Loved it.

I've cruised on Costa twice (including the Concordia...sad) and a few of the better known lines like Norwegian, Holland America but the QM2 was the best.

First off, its not a cruise ship, its an ocean liner and though the "brand" is constantly being cheapened by Carnival, it seems to attract an older crowd that isn't as prone to some of the spring-break-like crowd that Carnival does. My cruise on QM2 had 3 or 4 formal nights that were a lot of fun. The food was great, drinks were strong (but $$) but I think my favorite part of it was Tea at 4 everyday.

Our trip back to NY was through a nor-easter that was ripping up the coast. Wow, the seas were rough and the winds incredible. We couldn't go out on deck and the ship was rocking, but because it was built for trans-atlantic sailings, it wasn't as bad as it would have been on say, one of the big cruise ships.

Some things are the same... i.e. large lineups getting on and off the ship but Cunard seems to have it down to an art. Costa, Norwegian and Holland Americas embarking/disembarking was such mayhem, you'd think that it was the first time they'd ever done it.

I'm in no big hurry to go on another cruise, unless it's on the QM2 or one of the other Cunard ships.

by Anonymousreply 7801/15/2012

These top heavy cruise ships seem dangerous to me as they can surely capsize easily, and surely they have radar to stop rocks ?

When I used to travel to Ireland from England on the ferries I always stayed hear the top deck as if you are below and something happens its almost imopossible to get out. I was once on a weekend cruise from England to Sweden and our cabins were way below at the bottom of the ship - scary - and we passed over where than ferry from Tallin sank killing all 900 on board...

by Anonymousreply 7901/15/2012

[quote]When I used to travel to Ireland from England on the ferries I always stayed hear the top deck

I hear you. I was on an over-crowded ferry in Sierra Leone - the kind you see on the news because they're always turning over. I sat on the top deck by the life jacket locker. It was broiling hot in the sun that day but I didn't move away from those life jackets.

FOr crossing the Atlantic, I love a speedy ship. We were going at 36 knots. It was great.

by Anonymousreply 8001/15/2012

Shanna, they bought their tickets, they knew what they were getting into. I say, let 'em drown.

by Anonymousreply 8101/15/2012

[quote]I was once on a weekend cruise from England to Sweden and our cabins were way below at the bottom of the ship - scary - and we passed over where than ferry from Tallin sank killing all 900 on board...

How was that possible, on a weekend cruise from England to Sweden? The MS Estonia sank off of Estonia, closer to Finland and pretty far from Sweden (when it's being approached from England anyway)

by Anonymousreply 8201/15/2012

Crown Princess Cruise Accident -- 2006

Thanks to doggfan7 for this onboard report: "This was probably the scariest moment I have ever experienced. The water came up to the Promenade Deck and actually almost hit the lifeboats. We have heard that the rear and port side of the ship were fairly well in the air.

"The stairwells turned into waterfalls. The gift shops and casino turned into glass and chip graveyards.

"The dining room right now is full of injured people and passenger doctors and nurses are doing whatever they can to help.

"The 5th deck seems to catch the worst as there is blood all over the place. I saw a man with a broken foot hobble to the dining room bloody and crying and kids screaming. The internet cafe is crowded with people booking flights home from Florida as they do not want to stay on.

"About an hour before it happened, the captain said we were going into rough waters and that they turned the stabilizer on so it could be. They said the steering mechanism locked though.

"We will be in port in about 5 minutes they said and they have ambulances waiting for those seriously injured, and believe me there are quite a few. I had typed an account of the worst injury I have heard of a little girl but just erased it as it is too sad and gross."

SeaBrz is ashore and says: "It's a little crazy out here in Cape Canaveral. Lots of helicopters, mostly news that I can see, but some red/white ones (Coast Guard?). Was told by a port worker that 20 ambulances were requested, four pumper trucks, and other assorted emergency vehicles. As posted above, according to the news (Channel 2) the Coast Guard needs to establish that the ship is controllable before they will let it into Port since it's supposedly listing at 12 degrees. Not sure what the option is."

Nliedel offers this chilling account. "Regarding injuries. People are badly injured. They called, "Alpha, Alpha, Alpha." They have closed the medical center to all but serious injuries and opened a satellite medical center. Carol is posting under my name, so it's not all just me posting.

"We have no idea what will happen. There is glass everywhere. Some people were hit by TV's falling off the shelves. There are some very severe cuts that I personally saw. The crew is very busy and people are panicking in life vests. Carol says some crew panicked and handed out life vests. They did not call the muster drill.

"Did I say Titanic is the MUTS movie tonight? That's some irony for you."

More from Nliedel (Carol): "Deborah, also one of our Cruise Critic group, was in an elevator when it happened. She's still shaking. CaroleLee was naked on a massage table in the Lotus Spa. As the ship listed, the equipment table next to her went sliding, and her table traveled about 15 feet across the corridor into a treatment room across the way. All of the Lotus Spa Pool is now in the Lotus Spa.

"The contents of the gift shops are all over the floors, mostly smashed. The contents of the bars are on the floors, and equipment is leaning or fallen.

"There is broken glass everywhere and many people are injured. There are children crying, and some passengers were handed life jackets by crew members. This just made them more upset.

I see people limping, bloody feet and other cuts. Most of the people that we know have wandered by and we know that they're ok. We are sitting outside the Explorers Bar."

"The captain came on and made an announcement that there was a problem with the steering mechanism and the captain sounded so terrified, which led to my feeling of more panic," said passenger Carol O’Connell. She said she saw flooding, tables overturned and broken glass everywhere.

One person interviewed on GMA this morning said that this problem didn't start with the big tip to the side yesterday afternoon. She said that the beds in their cabin and been at a slight slant for two days.

by Anonymousreply 8301/15/2012

Was Shelley Winters on it?

by Anonymousreply 8401/15/2012

I know it's been mentioned here, but whoever does the PR for Carnival Cruise is doing a masterful job of keeping their name out of this.

by Anonymousreply 8501/15/2012

There has to be something more to the story.

by Anonymousreply 8601/15/2012

This photo should boost Cruise Sales....

by Anonymousreply 8701/15/2012

Micky Arison owns The Carnival Group r85, and the guy is brilliant. Shifty, but brilliant. And he does have a strong PR team.

I've always been concerned about the seaworthiness of these megaships - they are top-heavy, have shallow drafts and the hulls are quite thin. Someone mentioned how solid the QM2 is, and that is the God's Honest Truth. That is because she does tackle the Atlantic, while other non-ocean liners sail calmer waters, so companies don't build their hulls as strong as the QM2s. I bet it would be prohibitively expensive to do that. YMMV, but I bet the QM2 would have survived this mishap better than this large but flimsy Costa ship.

by Anonymousreply 8801/15/2012

Two more bodies have just been discovered.

by Anonymousreply 8901/15/2012

Jesus R83. I'd rather fly too.

[quote]However, the NTSB found that the second officer, the senior watch officer on the bridge, disengaged the automatic steering mode of the vessel’s integrated navigation system after it put the ship into what the officer felt was an unusually hard turn to port and took manual control of the steering. The second officer turned the wheel first to port and then from port to starboard several times, eventually causing the vessel to list even more, to a maximum angle of about 24° to starboard. The severe listing tumbled passengers, crew members, pool water, and everything else not secured about the decks.

by Anonymousreply 9001/15/2012

I'm afraid they're gonna start finding all those missing dead inside that ship or in the ocean. I think 41 are still missing.

by Anonymousreply 9101/15/2012

Cruises are becoming a traveler's nightmare. Rape of minor girls by crew members, unexplained illnesses, passengers disappearing are peppering the news every month.

by Anonymousreply 9201/15/2012

[quote]Thank goodness it wasn't a gay cruise.

Im just glad I wasn't on board.

by Anonymousreply 9301/15/2012

The next PR nightmare is the fact that they have this giant fucking cruise ship where anyone and everyone can see it and take digital photos. It'll take months to get her refloated, and every step in the process will be news.

It's going be like the Morro Castle, the liner that caught on fire and drifted ashore right onto the tourist beach at Ashbury Park, NJ.

When that happened they ran special excursions from NYC and Philadelphia to let the crowds see it.

by Anonymousreply 9401/15/2012

[quote]29 Filipino kitchen workers were feared trapped in the bowels of the 951ft, £390 million Concordia.

Very sad. A lot has not changed since the Titanic.

by Anonymousreply 9501/15/2012

[quote]Just wondering what the point would be for the captain to stay aboard after the point where he couldn't do anything.

Honor.

by Anonymousreply 9601/15/2012

Wait!! They have it all wrong. That movie I did with Ben Affleck was a TRAINWRECK!!

by Anonymousreply 9701/15/2012

Found an elderly couple dead near the restaurant. Still had their life vests on. I guess the elderly would have a hard time crawling up vertical walls.

by Anonymousreply 9801/15/2012

This why computers will be our overlords they don't make stupid mistakes or get drunk.

by Anonymousreply 9901/15/2012

R99 is on our list.

by Anonymousreply 10001/15/2012

Costa Concordia is a bad luck ship. When it was launched in 2005, the bottle of champagne hurled against the ship's hull failed to break - a sign seafarers consider to be a harbinger of bad luck.

In 2008, the ship tried to enter the port of Palermo during a storm and was damaged when it smashed into the pier.

This accident took place on Friday the 13th.

by Anonymousreply 10101/15/2012

The Morro Castle disaster was particularly horrific. The captain died the night before under mysterious circumstances; after the fire started, the crew, including the first officer, nominally in charge of the ship, abandoned before most of the passengers, similar to what has happened with the Costa Concordia. There was no general alarm. Passengers tried to escape by squeezing through the portholes, only to get stuck; those who came down to see the ship after it had drifted to the New Jersey shore reported seeing the people still hanging out of the portholes, dead, their faces contorted in pain and terror.

by Anonymousreply 10201/15/2012

R102, don't forget the fact that the fire started in the forward part of the ship, and passengers gathered at the stern. The powerless ship drifted to where the wind was blowing from bow to stern, and the passengers stood there watching the wind blow the flames closer and closer and closer.

I believe the theory that the radio operator set the fire.

by Anonymousreply 10301/15/2012

Why some never cruise again

by Anonymousreply 10401/15/2012

The company operating the Costa Concordia says the captain may have "committed errors".

He appears to have sailed too close to land and not to have followed the company's emergency procedures, Costa Crociere said in a statement.

Capt Francesco Schettino is suspected of manslaughter, but denies wrongdoing.

"It seems that the commander made errors of judgement that had serious consequences," Costa Crociere said.

"The route followed by the ship turned out to be too close to the coast, and it seems that his decision in handling the emergency didn't follow Costa Crociere's procedures which are in line, and in some cases, go beyond, international standards," the statement added.

Capt Schettino has been detained on suspicion of manslaughter. The chief prosecutor said the vessel had "very ineptly got close to Giglio".

First officer Ciro Ambrosio has also been detained.

by Anonymousreply 10501/15/2012

[quote]He appears to have sailed too close to land

I doubt if he'll fight that charge.

by Anonymousreply 10601/15/2012

Morro Castle: interesting pics

by Anonymousreply 10701/15/2012

100 years after Titanic, exactly. Creepy.

by Anonymousreply 10801/15/2012

[quote]FOr crossing the Atlantic, I love a speedy ship. We were going at 36 knots.

No you weren't.

by Anonymousreply 10901/15/2012

[quote]100 years after Titanic, exactly.

"Exactly"?

by Anonymousreply 11001/15/2012

Not exactly the death toll of Titanic either.

by Anonymousreply 11101/15/2012

r107, check out this guy, sadly one of the victims. So tragic when gorgeous men die.

by Anonymousreply 11201/15/2012

A prosecutor confirmed they are investigating allegations the captain abandoned the stricken liner before all the passengers had escaped.

According to the Italian navigation code, a captain who abandons a ship in danger can face up to 12 years in prison.

A French couple who boarded the Concordia in Marseille, Ophelie Gondelle and David Du Pays, told the Associated Press they saw the captain in a lifeboat, covered by a blanket, well before all the passengers were off the ship.

"The commander left before and was on the dock before everyone was off," said Gondelle, 28, a French military officer.

"Normally the commander should only leave at the end," said Du Pays.

Coast Guard officers later spotted Schettino on land as the evacuation unfolded. The officers urged him to return to his ship and honor his duty to stay aboard until everyone was safely off the vessel, but he ignored them, Coast Guard Cmdr. Francesco Paolillo said.

by Anonymousreply 11301/15/2012

[quote]Costa Concordia is a bad luck ship. When it was launched in 2005, the bottle of champagne hurled against the ship's hull failed to break - a sign seafarers consider to be a harbinger of bad luck.

Aren't sailors superstitious anymore?

by Anonymousreply 11401/15/2012

Were you there R109? Or maybe just wanting to bump the thread with a silly comment?

by Anonymousreply 11501/16/2012

FYI, the QM2's max cruising speed is 30 knots.

I wonder what Costa Crociere will end up doing with the ship. It's obviously too close to land for them to safely scuttle it where it is, so the question becomes, once they refloat it, will they tow it into deeper water and scuttle it there, or sell it for scrap?

by Anonymousreply 11601/16/2012

There are a number of large ships that exceed that speed, though they're not cruise ships. More than a half century ago, Adm. Arleigh Burke was known as "31-knot Burke" for the way he moved around the Pacific in ships built in the 40s. There are Navy ships that exceed that today.

by Anonymousreply 11701/16/2012

But most ships today aren't built like ocean liners, and can't handle those speeds or, indeed, rough seas.

That's one of the main reasons why the ships that spend their summers in Northern Europe or the Mediterranean and their winters in the Caribbean and South America cross the Atlantic near the equator.

All of the Carnival brands operate independently of each other (although they had just unified Cunard's US operations with Princess as I was leaving the industry), and I find myself wondering if they'll end up transferring the ships to some of their other brands or renaming the line.

by Anonymousreply 11801/16/2012

[quote]I wonder what Costa Crociere will end up doing with the ship. It's obviously too close to land for them to safely scuttle it where it is, so the question becomes, once they refloat it, will they tow it into deeper water and scuttle it there, or sell it for scrap?

It's not a total loss yet, although her list is increasing rather significantly, and if a storm hits she could work herself to pieces against the rocks. Time is of the essence.

As I understand it, the damage you can see is the main hole in the hull, and I guarantee you there's people preparing the steel for a patch to that as we speak. After that, lighten the load by removing fuel and contents, bring in the barge cranes and start pumping. There's still a good ship left there.

The moon is waning though, so it will probably be a few weeks before really high tides come along to help the process.

by Anonymousreply 11901/16/2012

It's not so much that I don't think the ship could be repaired. They could tow it around the boot of Italy to get it into Fincantieri's shipyard in Trieste, I just don't know that they could get anyone to sail on it.

Carnival Proper had their first purpose-built ship called the Tropicale that had a very ignoble end to its life. There was some horrible things that happened onboard--one of my former coworkers was aboard when the sewer system backed up and she was so digusted she left the ship in Cozumel and flew home, and its reputation was so bad that they ended up transferring it to Costa briefly.

I just wonder if the cost of refloating, repairing it, and trying to undo some of the bad PR would be more expensive that just building a new ship.

by Anonymousreply 12001/16/2012

It is likely that if the ship gets repaired it would be sold off to another line and get a new name.

by Anonymousreply 12101/16/2012

I'm sure it would go to another line, I'm just wondering who would buy it. Maybe one of the Asian lines could turn it into a casino ship.

by Anonymousreply 12201/16/2012

If and when they salvage her, the odds are Titan Salvage will do the job. If you go to their website they show a photo of them righting a cruise ship in a situation very much like this one.

by Anonymousreply 12301/16/2012

I was watching MSNBC this afternoon and Tamron Hall had an phone interview with an American passenger, and he went off on the fact that once they were ashore, the ship's crew didn't do anything, and the passengers just sat on the shore for nine hours until some nuns from a convent in Giglio brought them blankets, food, and water.

by Anonymousreply 12401/16/2012

Titan? I think the name of the salvage company is Smit(s).

by Anonymousreply 12501/16/2012

Smit is the Dutch company they hired to offload the fuel. They could do it, but I'm still betting on Titan for the salvage.

by Anonymousreply 12601/16/2012

Oh, I follow you know R126. Thanks for clarifying.

by Anonymousreply 12701/16/2012

I mean, I follow you NOW R126.

by Anonymousreply 12801/16/2012

Because the head waiter wanted to wave to his family????

!!!!!!

by Anonymousreply 12901/16/2012

The Chinese will buy it and turn it into a ferry to be used in the Philippines. We will read about 7000 dead when it goes down.

by Anonymousreply 13001/16/2012

Shares of Carnival Cruise are down 17% in pre-market trading. If it stays down when the stock market opens, that means a loss in the value of the stock of over 4 billion dollars.

Obviously that's far more than the potential impact of the accident itself, but they say cruise bookings are down 6-10%, and the danger is that the press will keep on making this front page news for months.

by Anonymousreply 13201/17/2012

I heard they're blasting the hull now.

by Anonymousreply 13301/17/2012

[quote]Shares of Carnival Cruise are down 17% in pre-market trading. If it stays down when the stock market opens, that means a loss in the value of the stock of over 4 billion dollars.

As I said before, I bet Carnival Corp ends up rebranding Costa, or closing it entirely and either selling their existing fleet or transferring them to other lines.

Forgetting whatever Italian laws the captain may have broken, I'm pretty sure Costa Crociere violated some international maritime laws.

by Anonymousreply 13401/17/2012

The apparently have audio of the officials on shore ordering the captain (who had already jumped into a lifeboat) to return to his ship and do his duty, and the captain is acting like a little whiney little bitch and refusing to do it. He's so fucked.

by Anonymousreply 13501/17/2012

From The Traveler's Insider:

Costa Cruise Ship Sinking With Costa Cruise Line's recent accident with the sinking of the Concordia, it reminds me of a post I did way back when the mega ships were first coming out on the scene. While these ships sound fantastic, I had and still have two concerns about them. First, getting lost in the crowds and having to deal with long lines on board. And second, how long would it take to evacuate the ship in an emergency and how well equipped were they to do this.

With the Costa sinking passengers are reporting that many crew members were not prepared for an evacuation and were giving passenger conflicting information. Some crew members who were assigned to operate the life boats clearly did not know how to properly operate them and actually caused some life boats to be unusable. Do cruise lines take into consideration that some life boats may malfunction or do they only have just enough life boats to cover the number of passengers and no extra.

Also as the ship became over run with water is tilted to the side which meant that the life boats on one side of the ship couldn't be lowered so what do the passengers do who were assigned to those boats do? Do cruise lines ever reviews these conditions when going over their evacuation plans?

Some passengers on the Concordia said some crew members were separating families telling them women and children were being loaded on the life boats and men had to wait or go to other life boats. One family said it reminded them of the movie The Titanic and were terrified at the thought of being separated.

So many things went wrong during this evacuation. Not to mention this disaster should have never happened in the first place. Hopefully there will be some lessons learned from this. Cruise lines with these mega ships need to take a good hard look at their evacuation plans and crew training. And make sure they take a variety of situations into consideration.

by Anonymousreply 13601/17/2012

But check this out:

Our luxury ocean liners are designed and being built specifically for people to live aboard full time. Every aspect of our residential luxury liners is designed for people to live onboard and enjoy a quality lifestyle.

There are many differences between our residential ships and ships that are made just for cruises. The main difference is the type of hull. Ours is a double wall, twin hull super structure that provides a wider floating area in the water, and vastly increases the level of comfort compared to single hulls. Much like comparing a bicycle to a hybrid car, or a single hulled boat to a twin hulled catamaran. The steel in the hull in each liner is thicker for added strength and reliability. In fact, our hulls will be four times thicker than any ships or boats ever built.

The other main differences are the accommodations, amenities, and facilities onboard.

We have cabins, suites, and staterooms, but most are larger and each one has either a kitchenette or a kitchen.

We have homes that are the size of condos or apartments, and places that are like large estates you could fit three or four condo or apartment units inside.

There is a 120,000 sq ft hospital aboard that will be a fully equipped medical center. Doctors offices, dentist offices, optometrists for your eye care, specialists, surgeons, and other healthcare professionals to look after your healthcare anywhere in the world we visit, stay, or travel.

A 150,000 sq ft grocery store with a bakery, a delicatessen, fresh produce, frozen foods, international wine choices, fine food and beverage products.

A 250,000 square foot shopping complex that has an integrated art gallery. Within the shopping complex there are many stores, eateries and conveniences.

Our main restaurants are all bundled into one area for your convenience as well. There are twelve restaurant establishments located within two floors with a choice of food from the world.

The entertainment and leisure facilities are numerous and span two levels as well. Everything is inside, in a climate controlled area and available for use 24 hours a day. There are tennis courts, a basketball court, a golf practice course, and racquetball. There are a total of six indoor soft water swimming pools that are supplied water from our paradise waterfalls. There are multiple movie theaters, bowling lanes, entertainment rooms, a sports bar, grill and lounge, a concert stage, Casino Enterplex, and more.

There is a community center / night clubs, spas, a fitness center, outdoor pools, and many other items to make the quality of life for residents and guests convenient and comfortable.

When you buy a property with us, you own the property just like your neighbor.

When we visit a place during our voyage, we will be staying for two or three days so you can see as much as you want at your leisure.

If you are planning your retirement and want to retire where it's warm, we have better than the best options available. We have the ultimate way to retire and see the world as you enjoy retirement.

There are no condo fees or maintenance fee, and no property taxes, and you only pay for what you, your spouse, or family use. Just about everything else is inclusive. A lifestyle that allows you to experience.

by Anonymousreply 13701/17/2012

[quote]The apparently have audio of the officials on shore ordering the captain (who had already jumped into a lifeboat) to return to his ship and do his duty,

I just heard the audio on NPR. The official was yelling at the captain to get back to his ship. As we know, he didn't return to the ship and stayed on shore. Italian law allows 12 years in prison for a captain who abandons his ship.

by Anonymousreply 13801/17/2012

Not only officials -- Italian Coast Guard Officers. They are like coastal cops and have legal jurisdiction, so to ignore them will probably bring a bunch of additional charges.

by Anonymousreply 13901/17/2012

What sort of "sailors" are these who would sail under a ship that's had a name change? Or one where the champagne bottle didn't break at christening? Or one that has such a black history?

I'd never set foot on one of those things - they are BAD LUCK and DOOMED.

by Anonymousreply 14001/17/2012

Actually, in submarines (maybe other ships too for all I know), it's considered lucky to be on one that has sunk. After all, the ship has it out of its system now, and besides, what are the odds of it happening twice?

by Anonymousreply 14101/17/2012

[quote]What sort of "sailors" are these who would sail under a ship that's had a name change?

Cruise ships undergo name changes all the time. Smaller lines that aren't part of the Big Three often buy older ships when other lines modernize their fleets.

Boutique line Oceania Cruises first three ships were purchased from the bankrupt Renaissance Cruises and refurbished and renamed, and Royal Caribbean's boutique line, Azamara bought two of Renaissance's other ships.

MS Caronia, which was the second ship Cunard had before the QM2 debuted, started its life as the Vistafjord and now sails as the Saga Ruby.

And that's just what I can think of off the top of my head.

by Anonymousreply 14201/17/2012

For VOTN:

Kinda off subject, but since you probably know the answer: What ever happened to the ship used in the Love Boat TV series?

by Anonymousreply 14301/17/2012

The original Pacific Princess now sails as the MS Pacific for a South American line.

There is a current ship using the same name, which, like the ships I mentioned earlier began as a ship for Renaissance Cruises.

by Anonymousreply 14401/17/2012

[quote] What sort of "sailors" are these who would sail under a ship that's had a name change? Or one where the champagne bottle didn't break at christening? Or one that has such a black history?

Ones who come from a ship's port of registry like Liberia or some such, where they have no real experience on ships, cruise or otherwise.

by Anonymousreply 14501/17/2012

The ships may be registered in Liberia or Gibraltar or Bermuda, but most of the officers are European, and most of the crew (cabin stewards, waitstaff, bartenders, etc) are from Eastern Europe, Southeast Asia, or Central America.

My very first cruise, on the former Celebrity ship Horizon, I spent hours in the champagne bar trying to flirt with a Romanian waiter by talking about Romanian politics, which my friend, who I was traveling with, remarked was A)the oddest idea of flirting that she'd ever seen, and B)surprised that I could actually hold a conversation about Eastern European politics. Hell, I don't get out much, so I read.

by Anonymousreply 14601/17/2012

And since we've been talking about some of the tackier ships, I'll just finish this evening with a bit of Cool Britannia, Cunard's Three Queens.

First, the current Queen Elizabeth, who is not the QE3 because she doesn't carry the RMS designation.

When HM christened the ship, the president of Cunard remarked that HM was the only person there at the christening of all three ships named Queen Elizabeth. She was there as a child when her mother christened the first, and she herself christened the other two.

by Anonymousreply 14701/17/2012

The Queen Victoria, which Camilla christened.

by Anonymousreply 14801/17/2012

And finally, the Grande Dame, the Queen Mary 2. Enjoy a virtual tour.

by Anonymousreply 14901/17/2012

VOTN you're my kinda man.

by Anonymousreply 15001/17/2012

The travel agent in me dies hard: Yeah, there are a lot of ships that have tackier elements (even though those can also be a hell of a lot of fun), but if you want a real elegant experience, you can find one of them too.

Having said that, Carnival (the line, not the corporation) is adding Guy Fieiri Burger Bars to a few of its ships, and for that I weep.

by Anonymousreply 15101/18/2012

Pffft, amateurs.

by Anonymousreply 15201/18/2012

[quote]but if you want a real elegant experience, you can find one of them too.

I don't want that. I want Peter Lorre, Sydney Greenstreet, and maybe Gene Tierney as mysterious fellow passengers. I want streaks of rust down the sides of the hull, and I want the foghorn to blow every night while I walk the empty decks.

Tell me where that cruise ship is and I'll be interested.

You can keep the ships like this Costa Concordia, because the only appealing thing about that ship was the Captain. Him I like-- careless, alcoholic, slovenly in appearance and performance, and a coward through and through. I'll sail with him any day.

by Anonymousreply 15301/18/2012

Costa Cocordia looks like an unattractive apartment building set down on a barge.

by Anonymousreply 15401/18/2012

A lot of modern ships look like that, because, honestly, that's what they are.

I've been trying to find interior pictures from the accident, but the web seems to have been scrubbed clean.

by Anonymousreply 15501/18/2012

Found a few, finally. Click on one to enlarge, and you can scroll through.

by Anonymousreply 15601/18/2012

[quote]The ships may be registered in Liberia or Gibraltar or Bermuda, but most of the officers are European, and most of the crew (cabin stewards, waitstaff, bartenders, etc) are from Eastern Europe, Southeast Asia, or Central America.

Thanks for clearning that up. Liberians can "usually" sail.

Whatever happened to hiring a Greek crew? If I'm gonna sail, I want a Greek crew.

by Anonymousreply 15701/18/2012

Celebrity Cruises' officers might be primarily Greek. I can't find my ship encyclopedia, and since Wikipedia's on blackout I can't look there, but they were originally a Greek line called Chandris (which is why their logo today is a Greek chi) before Royal Caribbean (which is Norwegian, if you can believe that) bought them out.

Also, Cunard liners have British crews and proudly so.

by Anonymousreply 15801/18/2012

VOTN--You are an enterprising netizen:

Is it still possible to access Wikipedia in any way?

Yes. During the blackout, Wikipedia is accessible on mobile devices and smart phones. You can also view Wikipedia normally by disabling JavaScript in your browser, as explained on this Technical FAQ page. Our purpose here isn't to make it completely impossible for people to read Wikipedia, and it's okay for you to circumvent the blackout. We just want to make sure you see our message.

by Anonymousreply 15901/18/2012

I ended up figuring out that I could still get on via the app on my iPad too. But sadly enough, a lot of this is just useless information I happen to know.

by Anonymousreply 16001/18/2012

They placed booms around the hull before the sea came up and started moving the ship, so it is not clear if they can keep the oil leaking and destroying the shore.

As for the captain, it was all over for him the minute he agreed to the headwaiter's request and left course. So for all the yelling about the Law of The Sea, he realized there was nothing that would save him -- not even maritime heroics -- so he decided just to make himself comfortable as the disaster played out.

Not brave, not just, not moral, but a reflection of our times.

by Anonymousreply 16101/18/2012

The Coast Guard officer who ordered the captain of the capsized Italian cruise ship to go back aboard unwittingly became an instant hero on Wednesday, credited with saving the national honor on one of its darkest nights.

Italy has become enthralled with the tale of two captains.

One is Coast Guard Captain Gregorio De Falco, who furiously ordered the skipper of the Costa Concordia to return to his ship and oversee the rescue operations.

The other is Captain Francesco Schettino - whom newspapers have branded a coward for fleeing in the face of adversity and who is now under house arrest, accused of multiple manslaughter, causing a shipwreck and abandoning ship.

"Listen Schettino, perhaps you have saved yourself from the sea but I will make you look very bad. I will make you pay for this. Go on board (Expletive!)" De Falco yelled at Schettino during a 4-minute radio exchange made public on Tuesday.

The Italian word De Falco used, "cazzo" in Italian, is slang for the male sexual organ but it is commonly used to emphasize something, equivalent to "Go on board, damn it."

The imperative phrase in Italian -- "Vada a bordo, cazzo!" -- was already on T-shirts by Wednesday morning.

(from Yahoo news)

by Anonymousreply 16201/18/2012

Another memorable exchange between the two captains, listened to by millions of Italians since it was made public, is when De Falco tells Schettino:

"You get back on board! That is an order! There is nothing else for you to consider. You have sounded the "Abandon Ship." I am giving the orders now. Get back on board. Is that clear?"

by Anonymousreply 16301/18/2012

Video of survivors getting into lifeboats

by Anonymousreply 16401/18/2012

[quote]The imperative phrase in Italian -- "Vada a bordo, cazzo!" -- was already on T-shirts by Wednesday morning.

I just searched ebay for that phrase, and there were already 108 results.

by Anonymousreply 16501/18/2012

Not at all, VOTN. I'm glad you're answering questions. It's not common knowledge.

I'll keep in mind Cunard has British sailors. They're pretty seaworthy!

by Anonymousreply 16601/18/2012

Why do people keep saying only six people have died when twice that number are missing! It's so outrageous!

by Anonymousreply 16701/18/2012

Those poor people, R164. Can you imagine how dark it was?

by Anonymousreply 16801/18/2012

I just saw the most disgusting "Titanic" tie-ins ever on E1. Turns out they were playing Celine Dion's "My Heart Will Go On" in one of the restaurants at the time of the accident. Then they called up all the stars of the movie to ask them what they thought of the accident.

by Anonymousreply 16901/18/2012

Do you think history will record only six dead and pretend they don't know about those who are [bold]MISSING[/bold]?

by Anonymousreply 17001/18/2012

Does the Captain have a family? Children? Can you imagine having THAT last name? He destroyed the surname. It will always be associated with cowardice.

by Anonymousreply 17101/18/2012

[quote]Then they called up all the stars of the movie to ask them what they thought of the accident.

Now WTF are you supposed to say to that? Seriously?

by Anonymousreply 17201/18/2012

Interesting photo

by Anonymousreply 17301/18/2012

I did finally dig out my ship atlas. I'd completely forgotten this, but Costa ships are actually registered in Italy, which would make sense, since their ships were built there.

Of course, I hadn't forgotten this: All the Cunard Queens are registered in the UK and proudly fly the Union Jack.

I'll be very interested to see what kind of deals Costa's offering on sailings in about six months. They've got some incredibly cheap 10-night Caribbean cruises for the next two or so months, but they always tend to be cheap, as most of their passengers who cruise on this side of the Atlantic tend to be from South America.

by Anonymousreply 17401/18/2012

[quote]Interesting photo

It's extremely unfortunate, but the Costa Serena, the ship that's pictured with its lights on, is on its way back to its home port, Savona, from Civitavecchia, which puts it close to Giglio. I'm honestly not sure how it would work, but under the same international maritime laws that the Concordia's captain likely broke, they are required to respond to a ship in distress, although they're obviously way past the point where they could render any assistance.

Serena is also Concordia's sister-ship. So too, creepily enough, is the Carnival Splendor, which made headlines a few years back when it lost all its power and couldn't restore it, so they had to be tugged back in to San Diego, and when the food ran out, the USS Ronald Reagan airlifted them supplies.

In all seriousness, though, as horrible as that situation was, Carnival handled it really, really well.

by Anonymousreply 17501/18/2012

[quote]"Listen Schettino, perhaps you have saved yourself from the sea but I will make you look very bad. I will make you pay for this. Go on board (Expletive!)"

Anybody care to give a DL version of this?

I'm thinking, "Listen, bitch! You might have saved your tatty ass from the Poseidon Adventure but I will make you look worse than Joan River's goatee. Nobody will fuck you when I'm done. Now get your fat gunt back on that boat!"

by Anonymousreply 17601/18/2012

I liked it better in the original Italian.

by Anonymousreply 17701/18/2012

And one of the stars of the movie said that the movie filming was so realistic that he understood how the passengers must have felt, and you lose all sense of up and down when the ship is listing!

by Anonymousreply 17801/18/2012

The dark adds to the confusion.

by Anonymousreply 17901/18/2012

[quote]First, the current Queen Elizabeth, who is not the QE3 because she doesn't carry the RMS designation.

One has nothing to do with the other. Are you saying that the Royal Mail dictates what name a ship carries? QE2, contrary to popular belief, was not an RMS either.

[quote]Also, Cunard liners have British crews and proudly so.

Other than officers, Cunard's crew is in line with the industry standard of predominately crewing their ships with Eastern European, Filipino, and Indonesian crews. There are some British waiters, bartenders, and pursers and of course the Entertainment Crew.

[quote]Of course, I hadn't forgotten this: All the Cunard Queens are registered in the UK and proudly fly the Union Jack.

None of the Cunard Queens are registered in the UK any longer. They're all registered in Bermuda, as of late last year. The only UK-registered line now is P&O

by Anonymousreply 18001/18/2012

"Chicken of the Sea"

Ha ha!

by Anonymousreply 18101/18/2012

This guy is such a bozo I can't believe they allowed him anywhere near the bridge. First he steers millions of dollars worth of ship to wave to a pal and then says he tripped and landed in the lifeboat.

by Anonymousreply 18201/18/2012

The caption is obviously very emotionally immature and a show-off.

He went close to the shore so that his head waiter could wave to his family.

How could the family have seen their relative, the waiter, at night on such a gargantuan ship?

Or even if it wasn't dark, the waiter would be a tiny speck waving on the huge ship.

by Anonymousreply 18301/18/2012

captain

by Anonymousreply 18401/18/2012

Of course, the idea of the waiter waving to the family is hugely foolhardy, ridiculous, irresponsible, and a travesty and the foolish idea of a very emotionally immature, irresponsible captain.

by Anonymousreply 18501/18/2012

It wasn't a waiter. It was the captain. He was going to wave to salute Commodore Mario Palombo who he had on the phone. Apparently he admitted this in court. I don't think the guy was even out there to try to see him do it.

by Anonymousreply 18601/18/2012

[quote]First he steers millions of dollars worth of ship to wave to a pal and then says he tripped and landed in the lifeboat.

He may very well have tripped and stumbled into the lifeboat. I think that he's this century's version of Joe Hazelwood (Exxon Valdez). IMO, Schettino was drunk and probably tried to get away by blending in with the passnegers in the lifeboat until he sobered up. Doing a foolhardy thing like steering the ship close to land to salute a commodore is just the type of thing some loaded grandiose guy would do. His responses to the coast guard were a but out there too. Hazelwood thought he could get away with it.

Hazelwood thought he could get away with it because, supposedly, there was no way to prove he was. There was some new technology comparing speech bandwidth patterns that compares people speaking in a normal unstressed state, stressed, experiencing various emotions and drunks to sober people. Hazelwood's speech bandwidth was a perfect match to a drunk's and he was found guilty (of what exactly, I can't remember).

by Anonymousreply 18701/19/2012

[quote]One has nothing to do with the other. Are you saying that the Royal Mail dictates what name a ship carries? QE2, contrary to popular belief, was not an RMS either.

Yes she was. Link is to a commemorative lapel pin Cunard gave passengers during a a special voyage they did after QM2 launched. They did a tandem crossing of the North Atlantic (it was the QE2's final transatlantic voyager) and once they arrived in Southampton they did a ceremonial handing over of the Boston Cup, which was presented to Sir Samuel Cunard when his first ship, RMS Britannia arrived in America (specifically Boston) for the first time, and was the symbolic handover of the position of Cunard flagship to the QM2.

One of the managers from my agency was on that voyage.

Since the current QE is a cruise ship and not an ocean liner, she did not receive a contract to carry the royal mail, and thus is only the MS Queen Elizabeth. She's also not built like an ocean liner; she and the Queen Victoria are like Holland America's Vista-class ships on steroids.

[quote]None of the Cunard Queens are registered in the UK any longer. They're all registered in Bermuda, as of late last year. The only UK-registered line now is P&O

Oh, that's just depressing.

by Anonymousreply 18801/19/2012

[quote]Just wondering what the point would be for the captain to stay aboard after the point where he couldn't do anything.

[quote]Honor

He ain't Japanese. Forget this honor shit. A life's more important.

by Anonymousreply 18901/19/2012

[quote]Why do people keep saying only six people have died when twice that number are missing! It's so outrageous!

Just because they're missing doesn't mean they're dead. They could be hanging out on an island somewhere waiting to be rescued. Have you never seen Lost?

by Anonymousreply 19001/19/2012

If I'd been on the ship, that captain wouldn't have dared to pull this shit. There'd have been blood everywhere on the deck, and then me saying, "OK, now I'm taking the wheel and finishing out your trip. Everyone relax."

by Anonymousreply 19101/19/2012

[quote]Why do people keep saying only six people have died when twice that number are missing! It's so outrageous!

They're probably dead, but there is a chance (very slim) there are still living souls inside that hull. There are almost certainly air pockets scattered throughout the hull.

Remember, they were still hearing pounding coming from inside the capsized ships at Pearl Harbor on Christmas Day.

by Anonymousreply 19201/19/2012

[quote]Yes she was. Link is to a commemorative lapel pin

No, she wasn't. As I said... "contrary to popular belief..." Cunard never pursued the RMS designation for her, and it was never granted by the Royal Mail. There are tons of merchandise,souvenirs, adverts, etc. saying "RMS", but it was never a fact, just a popular misconception.

[quote]Since the current QE is a cruise ship and not an ocean liner, she did not receive a contract to carry the royal mail, and thus is only the MS Queen Elizabeth.

I know why QE is "MS" rather than "RMS", but you said that QE is not "QE3" because she isn't an "RMS"

by Anonymousreply 19301/19/2012

I stand corrected.

Still depressed about the Bermuda thing, though.

by Anonymousreply 19401/19/2012

The latest NPR report says 21 still missing and divers are trying to get to a 4th level area designated for abandoning ship.

by Anonymousreply 19501/19/2012

Someone asked about the ship that was used on The Love Boat, VOTN's information was correct, but now that Wikipedia is back up, I can report that her recent history has not been good. She's changed hands and names a few times, has been used for drug smuggling, and has been tied up out of use at Genoa since 2008.

Usually when they sit for that long the trip to the Indian Scrapyard is coming soon.

by Anonymousreply 19601/19/2012

This is just more of a general gripe than anything specifically related to the Concordia, but when the industry crashed after 9/11, the lines responded by building smaller, more innovative ships, including some of my favorites, Royal Caribbean's Radiance-class and Carnival's Spirit-class. With the economic problems hitting over the last few years, they've decided to continue building big ships, but just cram more people on them.

by Anonymousreply 19701/19/2012

It's beginning to look as if there may be some funny business going on between the captain and the 25-year-old Moldovan blonde. Shortly before the crash, they had dinner together. She was said to be on the ship's bridge right after the ship hit the reef. Italian news reports have said prosecutors want to interview her.

by Anonymousreply 19801/19/2012

I'm not defending the Captain, but you have to understand that he was about as much a real captain as the kid who pretends to steer the riverboat at Disneyland. In fact, they give the kid at Disneyland a fake ship's wheel to pretend to steer with--this poor guy only had a desk chair and a computer joystick to play with all day.

The fact is, the computer sailed the ship, the GPS system steered the ship, and other people handled the real business of the ship, namely, the food and beverage operations, and the hotel operations. Meanwhile the engineering, the personnel, and all the other functions are handled by guys who are in constant real time communication with the Carnival home office, and that's where 99% of the decisions were made. (Make that 100% after this little fiasco. I'm sure Carnival is working on a new computer program to keep future captains from even steering the ship)

This poor guy's job was to walk around with his sailor outfit and play nice with the guests. I'm sure on the Disney Cruises they dispense with the bullshit and just have Donald Duck do it since he already has the uniform.

He spends his whole career playing Captain and making nice with the tourists, while the computer sails the ship in a lazy circle around the Mediterranean (the same route every damned week) and all of a sudden he's supposed to go down with the ship for the greater glory of Carnival Cruise? Fuck that noise.

He was probably sitting in the lifeboat before it even entered his head that he had a role in the little opera playing out on board. Again, I'm not defending him, but the day's of the captain actually being the "master" of the vessel are ancient history in this day and age of real time communication with the home office, especially on a floating party barge like this.

by Anonymousreply 19901/19/2012

It was the captain who took the ship off course, r199. It doesn't matter if it's normally run by a computer. It was the captain who took the ship off course. He ran the ship into a reef. A computer didn't do that. It was the captain who took the ship off course. It may have been his job to walk around with his sailor outfit and play nice with the guests but it wasn't his job to take the ship off course.

by Anonymousreply 20001/19/2012

No argument about that R200. He screwed the pooch, no doubt about that.

My only point was that after that exceptionally poor decision, how much good would Captain Crunch really have done in the evacuation? It's quite possible that he did the passengers a favor by NOT getting involved.

The system Carnival (and all the others) have in place is flawed. They have very poorly trained crews, their seamanship is marginal at best, and, as this poor slob clearly demonstrates, that goes right to the top of the organizational chart.

A real captain on a real ship would not only have known better than to hit the fucking rock to begin with, he would have known how to behave in an emergency. This guy failed on both counts, and I would suggest that it's the system that needs to be examined here as much as the character of the man in question.

by Anonymousreply 20101/19/2012

In this case even if he did NOTHING but stand and look impressive during the evacuation, I doubt he'd be getting so much flack.

The captain is PAID to LOOK like he's in charge. Even if he's not. Like any CEO.

Just his presence might have been enough to calm some of the older people on board.

by Anonymousreply 20201/19/2012

Just because.

by Anonymousreply 20301/19/2012

How on earth did this guy get to be captain? By all accounts he seems to be a slacker fuck up

by Anonymousreply 20401/20/2012

My cynical answer would be the same way anyone gets any position in Italy: graft and corruption.

by Anonymousreply 20501/20/2012

There are calls for cruise ships to be kept from sailing along the coast in Italy. That's one of the selling points so the cruise companies will fight that idea.

by Anonymousreply 20601/20/2012

Most cruise ships are actually driven by GPS, they do also (or rather, are supposed to) chart ther positions on good old paper navigation charts.

And it's not like the Italian coasts are very navigable unless your captain is an idiot.

by Anonymousreply 20701/20/2012

Someone needs to make a video of the capsized Costa Concordia with Celne Dion singing "My Heart Will Go On".

by Anonymousreply 20801/20/2012

Would an instrumental be acceptable?

by Anonymousreply 20901/20/2012

[quote]Most cruise ships are actually driven by GPS, they do also (or rather, are supposed to) chart their positions on good old paper navigation charts.

HA! They don't. I went on a cruise in the Med about 10 years ago and asked to see the charts (just because I think they are cool and wanted to see a "real" one).

Nobody knew where the charts were and the pat answer was, "we navigate by satellite now. We don't use charts."

Then I asked if any of them (this was on the bridge) could navigate by the stars. You'd think they'd never even HEARD of such a thing. Not a one of them could tell me where we were based on the sky.

THAT scared me.

by Anonymousreply 21001/20/2012

[quote]HA! They don't. I went on a cruise in the Med about 10 years ago and asked to see the charts (just because I think they are cool and wanted to see a "real" one).

It must have been more than ten years ago. I don't think they've let people onto bridges since 9/11.

That's neither here nor there. The lines that I was most familiar with, Royal Caribbean and Celebrity used paper charts. Maybe it was just for show, I dunno.

As for navigating by the stars, any way you slice it, those bridges have more in common with the Starship Enterprise than with a sailing vessel, so that doesn't really surprise me.

by Anonymousreply 21101/20/2012

[quote]Then I asked if any of them (this was on the bridge) could navigate by the stars. You'd think they'd never even HEARD of such a thing. Not a one of them could tell me where we were based on the sky. THAT scared me.

OK, I'll really scare you then. They stopped teaching it at the US Naval Academy about 15 years ago. The theory was that it took up too much time and it was obsolete since GPS did it for them anyway.

Now, since you can retire after 20 years and they haven't taught it for 15, ponder how few Naval Officers can still do it. To their credit it is still considered a necessary skill in the British Navy.

Now, if there is a war how long do you thing the GPS systems will be operational? How long before they're either taken out by killer satellites, rendered inoperative by electromagnetic pulse from an atomic blast, or the systems on the ship are damaged in battle? What then?

The no longer teach Morse Code either. Even though it's a pretty handy way of communicating via radio, signal flags, or signal lamps, it's no longer necessary in the opinion of the United States Navy.

by Anonymousreply 21201/20/2012

[quote]They stopped teaching it at the US Naval Academy about 15 years ago.

Things get easier every year at USNA. Before you know it, they'll cancel Plebe Summer and Herndon will be disappear.

by Anonymousreply 21301/20/2012

That is scary, R212. You would think that anyone who wants a career on the seas would have an interest in learning it not only for the reasons you've stated, but it's supposed to be part of the tradition and the lore that initially makes people want to become sailors.

by Anonymousreply 21401/20/2012

It's happening in many professions R214 -- MDs now just read blood tests or do CTs rather than examine a patient, the engineers just run calculation packages for answers rather than model for optimization...the science have been seriously dumbed down since computers and pre-developed software replaced hands-on work.

by Anonymousreply 21501/20/2012

[quote]You would think that anyone who wants a career on the seas would have an interest in learning it not only for the reasons you've stated, but it's supposed to be part of the tradition and the lore that initially makes people want to become sailors.

You would think, but take out the Midshipmen who are there because they want to fly jets, and the Midshipmen who want to be Marines, and the Midshipmen who want to be Seals--well, you get my point. There aren't as many future sailors there as you might think.

The Merchant Marine and Coast Guard still teach the old school skills as far as I know.

by Anonymousreply 21601/21/2012

R210 They were certainly yanking your chain...

All ships carry charts and all bridge officers know how to use them. They know very well that without GPS, for whatever reason, they'd be fucked without them.

by Anonymousreply 21701/21/2012

[quote]the science have been seriously dumbed down since computers and pre-developed software replaced hands-on work.

Boy, do you have that backward.

by Anonymousreply 21801/21/2012

I guess I should have said science workers have had their jobs dumbed down, VOTN -- but you are still in school, and you won't see it until you get out and start working.

You will never see a Bessel function again after you graduate because you will never solve an ODE again.

You will never have to worry about blood as a non-Newtonian fluid because you'll just get a paper with blood level results.

Everything will be calculated for you, every process pre-determined.

by Anonymousreply 21901/21/2012

But we're still expected to understand the underlying principles behind them.

The first time I got to use our school's Etruscan gas chromatograph, my professor told us about how much more difficult it had been when she was an undergrad, and then relayed the story of HER own undergraduate professor who had had to walk uphill barefoot in the snow to do gas chromatography.

My virology professor, who used to work in the CDC hot labs in Atlanta was telling us it's much nicer to be able to run an ELISA to identify a virus than to have to do hemagglutination assay.

[quote]You will never have to worry about blood as a non-Newtonian fluid because you'll just get a paper with blood level results.

I actually had a three-hour lecture on Starling's Law last night.

But we're wandering a bit afield from the topic.

by Anonymousreply 22001/21/2012

According to BBC: The body of a woman has been found on board the Italian cruise ship that ran aground and capsized a week ago, bringing the known death toll to 12.

The woman, who was wearing a life jacket, was found by divers on the fourth deck of the Costa Concordia.

The rest of the story at link below.

by Anonymousreply 22101/21/2012

The operator of the Costa Concordia is facing a class-action lawsuit in the US, it emerged on Friday.

Italy's consumer association Codacons and two US law firms told the BBC they would file the suit against Costa Cruises on behalf of the passengers.

They want at least $160,000 (£105,000) for each passenger on the ship.

by Anonymousreply 22201/21/2012

[quote]The Merchant Marine and Coast Guard still teach the old school skills as far as I know.

Well, praise Neptune. I guess those guys are still interested in being SAILORS.

Yes, you do scare me, r212. As you said, the GPS isn't always going to be there. Then how we will import all of that shit from China?

by Anonymousreply 22301/21/2012

2 more bodies found today.

by Anonymousreply 22401/23/2012

Searchers have found the bodies of two women on the wreck of the cruise ship Costa Concordia, bringing the confirmed death toll to 15.

Italian authorities say the pumping of fuel from the stricken vessel can proceed in tandem with the search of the wreck. It is carrying about 1.9m litres of fuel in 13 tanks.

The BBC's Luisa Baldini says the bodies of the two women were found near the internet cafe, on the fourth deck.

There is no decision yet on when fuel pumping will begin but the civil protection agency has said it is likely to start within the next 24 hours.

Civil protection official Franco Gabrielli told reporters on Giglio there was no risk the Costa Concordia would drop down to a lower seabed.

"We are ready to go," an official from the Dutch salvage company Smit told the BBC. "As soon as we get the green light, we start the work". Work is likely to begin on Tuesday.

Although there has been no leak so far, the civil protection agency says there is pollution in the water from solvents and disinfectants which were on board the vessel.

Coastguard and navy divers have been blasting their way into submerged areas of the vessel using explosives in an effort to find those unaccounted for.

Emergency officials said on Saturday they would not end the search until the whole ship had been examined.

by Anonymousreply 22501/23/2012

Customers who were on the cruise ship report that their credit cards have been charged for incidentals they had purchased, before the ship went down. And they are still demanding payment.

Seems a little petty, don't you think?

by Anonymousreply 22601/23/2012

How would a credit card company know that someone holding a credit card was involved in a shipwreck? It's just an account number and amount of purchase to them like millions of other purchases that they're processing every day.

by Anonymousreply 22701/23/2012

Same thing happened with all those phone calls on 9/11. Month later all the widows & widowers received the charges on the credit cards.

by Anonymousreply 22801/23/2012

Because when you are on a cruise, you give your credit card to be charged for your bar tabs, food and other stateroom sign offs.

Pretty ballsy to charge these people, I mean a ship sinking kind of dampened the holiday, no?

by Anonymousreply 22901/23/2012

[quote]Because when you are on a cruise, you give your credit card to be charged for your bar tabs, food and other stateroom sign offs.

Do you honestly think the credit card comapnies look at who is buying what and where they buy it?

VISA employee: "Oh look Mabel. Joe Skrote from Park Ridge went to an adult book store in New York and bought seven gay DVDs! He did the same thing last April."

by Anonymousreply 23001/23/2012

[quote]Do you honestly think the credit card comapnies look at who is buying what and where they buy it?

no, the cruise line has your cc info and implemented the charges.

by Anonymousreply 23101/23/2012

[quote}And they are still demanding payment.

How is this be true? Or even possible? It's not like any credit card statements which would include on-board purchases are now past-due... I doubt anyone has yet seen a bill with on-board purchases.

Besides,in my experience, on-board purchases are not tallied and charged to your card until just before the end of the cruise. Surely all those records are still on board and unprocessed. Don't forget that this cruise was barely even two hours old when the ship struck the rock. How much "incidental" and souvenir buying could anyone have done before then?

Even those passengers who were still onboard from the previous cruise wouldn't be receiving "demands" for payment yet.

this story is not true.

by Anonymousreply 23201/23/2012

Huffington Post UK has some rather dramatic photos of the night the ship sank.

I don't understand why the media are being so coy and saying the ship "partially" sank, since the only think partial about it to me is that the ship is still 25% above the water at high tide.

by Anonymousreply 23301/26/2012

Okay, now that's just weird: One of the survivors had a grandmother who was a Titanic survivor.

Granted, the story was in the Daily Mail, so take that with a grain of salt.

by Anonymousreply 23401/26/2012

Apologize for the very stupid question, but I have to ask: Are they just going to let it sink to the bottom to add more garbage to the ocean?

by Anonymousreply 23501/26/2012

No, because she's sitting in very shallow water which could be a navigation hazard. They will have divers go in and install these gigantic bags which they then inflate, giving the ship enough buoyancy to be tugged out into deeper waters. At that point, they will either scuttle the ship and let her sink somewhere safer, or more likely, sell the hull for scrap.

by Anonymousreply 23601/26/2012

Thanks for the explanation.

by Anonymousreply 23701/26/2012

Mrs. Schettino has chosen to ignore the fact that her husband was trying to get into some Moldovan hottie's pants right before crash.

The stories he must have told her when he came home. Probably the very same ones he used to regale his dinner guest.

[quote]Despite the disaster, she said that Schettino was renowned for his in-depth understanding of naval matters, revered by his crew, “as a point of reference and a teacher.”

[quote]She explained that although her husband may seem bold, it is only because his intelligence makes him able to put down his opponent. He is often “a cut above” the other party which makes him seem cheeky, she told Oggi.

by Anonymousreply 23801/26/2012

They may be able to salvage her and sell her. They've done it with ships in worse shape.

by Anonymousreply 23901/26/2012

[quote]I don't understand why the media are being so coy and saying the ship "partially" sank, since the only think partial about it to me is that the ship is still 25% above the water at high tide.

Well, ok, so you've just defined "partially sank", and you still don't understand? But, she's more than just "25% above the water"...

by Anonymousreply 24001/26/2012

Take what's in the box, or trade for what's behind the curtain?

[quote]ROME (AP) - Costa Crociere SpA is offering uninjured passengers euro11,000 ($14,460) apiece to compensate them for lost baggage and psychological trauma after its cruise ship ran aground and capsized off Tuscany when the captain deviated from his route.

Personally, I would grab that offer and laugh all the way to the bank.

by Anonymousreply 24101/27/2012

Only 11K Euros? Many of the passengers were stuck for days and had little or no help from the company from the moment the ship hit the rock. Does this even cover the expense of getting back home?

by Anonymousreply 24201/27/2012

R242 According to some survivor accounts I've read, Costa was pretty quick with booking flights and getting people to where they wanted to go.

by Anonymousreply 24301/28/2012

How come all the bodies found were wearing life jackets? So basically life jackets don't work, do they?

by Anonymousreply 24401/28/2012

[quote]They no longer teach Morse Code either. Even though it's a pretty handy way of communicating via radio, signal flags, or signal lamps, it's no longer necessary in the opinion of the United States Navy.

The easiest way for prisoners of war to communicate is with morse code.

Likewise between ships using light. Completely silent.

Encrypted communications can be sourced, if not understood, and can give away your position. A cell phone = "Bomb Me"

by Anonymousreply 24501/28/2012

R244, imagine you report to your lifeboat station wearing a life jacket. Your station happens to be on the side of the ship that is about to go underwater.

Once you get there you can't leave because the floor has slowly but surely become a wall and you can't climb it. You go down with the ship effectively on top of you. That's one reason why your life jacket might not work.

by Anonymousreply 24601/28/2012

If people wore working life jackets all the time, they would never die. But big pharma will never let that happen because they make too much money off of sales of all their cancer drugs.

by Anonymousreply 24701/28/2012

So have they found all the poor dead people yet?

by Anonymousreply 24801/28/2012

[quote]You go down with the ship effectively on top of you.

That's fucking awful!

by Anonymousreply 24901/28/2012

Why can they climb to the high side and crawl on top? That's just awful.

by Anonymousreply 25001/28/2012

Because it's slanting off at an angle, so what is "up/down" has been shifted radically. You're suddenly left where you have to climb up a shaft that's got minimal handholds.

by Anonymousreply 25101/28/2012

[quote]The easiest way for prisoners of war to communicate is with morse code. Likewise between ships using light. Completely silent.

Good point, r245. I'll keep that in mind for the next Apocalypse.

by Anonymousreply 25201/28/2012

Another body found:

by Anonymousreply 25301/28/2012

Rough seas stopped efforts to off-load fuel...

by Anonymousreply 25401/29/2012

I wouldn't put a life jacket on until I was on an outside deck. If you're inside, the life jacket can actually trap you -- if the only escape route is under water. And a flooding stateroom or corridor can happen very, very quickly.

This is why FAs tell passengers not to inflate their life jackets until outside the aircraft if they have to do an "emergency water landing." In situations where aircraft have crashed in the water, passengers who inflated their life vests inside the aircraft perished because they were trapped inside -- the vests simply lifted them with the water to the roof of the cabin, trapping them inside.

by Anonymousreply 25501/29/2012

Moldovan woman's panties and dresses found in captain's cabin..

by Anonymousreply 25602/02/2012

So, yes, Schettino is another Joe Hazelwood.

[quote]Cemortan first entered the tangled story of the wrecking of the Costa Concordia when a retired Italian couple told their local newspaper they had watched from a nearby table as the captain entertained a young woman at dinner. They claimed Schettino had drunk copious amounts of wine before heading back to the bridge. The captain and his employers have said he is teetotal.

by Anonymousreply 25702/02/2012

If anyone is still interested, the National Geographic Channel has a special about the sinking available On Demand right now. They've actually got footage from onboard while the ship was going down, and from divers who had gone inside the wreck to search for bodies/survivors.

They had interviews with several American passengers, as well as two British women who were dancers on the ship. Both of the dancers had rather dramatic stories of their escapes: one had to jump overboard and swim to shore, the other was winched off the ship via a Coast Guard helicopter.

by Anonymousreply 25803/24/2012

The last of the missing were thought to be the engine crew. Did they recover them?

by Anonymousreply 25903/24/2012

They just found some bodies yesterday. I think two people are still missing.

by Anonymousreply 26003/24/2012

Did they find the american couple yet?

by Anonymousreply 26103/25/2012

The bodies they found missing were trapped between the ship and the reef. So, basically, the ship rolled over on them or they were trapped on the underwater side, drowned, and floated free.

by Anonymousreply 26203/25/2012

They got all the fuel tanks emptied but there's sure to be lots of other stuff leaking from the ship that's fouling the waters around there.

by Anonymousreply 26303/27/2012

[quote]...there's sure to be lots of other stuff leaking from the ship that's fouling the waters around there.

In one of the few positive sides to the story, the olive oil slick is pre-seasoning local seafood.

by Anonymousreply 26403/28/2012

The captain of the shipwrecked Costa Concordia said in an interview broadcast Tuesday that he was distracted by a phone conversation shortly before the cruise liner crashed into a reef off an Italian island and capsized, killing 32 people.

Francesco Schettino described the collision to private Italian TV channel Canale 5 as a "banal accident" in which "destiny" played a role.

An Italian judge last week lifted Schettino's house arrest order, but said he must remain in his hometown near Naples during a criminal investigation in which he is accused of manslaughter, causing a shipwreck and abandoning the liner while many passengers and crew were still aboard.

Prosecutors have alleged that the Concordia cruised too close to the island in a publicity stunt, and shortly before it rammed the reef Schettino was on the phone with a retired sea captain on Giglio.

"I blame myself for being distracted," Schettino said when asked about the phone call.

Schettino on Tuesday appeared to want to lessen his role, insisting that another official, and not he, was at the helm of the ship at the moment it rammed the reef.

"At that moment, I went up to the bridge. I ordered the navigation to be manual, and I didn't have the command. The navigation was being directed by a (lower) official," Schettino said

"This is a banal accident in which destiny found space right in the interaction among human beings," Schettino added, apparently referring to the various officials on the bridge involved in the manoeuvr.

He said that for a captain of a ship, "there is no measure of sorrow" for losing a vessel. However, he said "it's much less" painful than losing a child — a reference to a young Italian girl who was among the dead.

A court hearing later this month in Tuscany on evidence in the case, including information from the ship's "black box" data recorder, could shed light on what went wrong and on who or what is to blame, and likely will figure in a judge's decision on whether Schettino should be ordered to stand trial.

by Anonymousreply 26507/11/2012

Schettino called the events in the accident "complex," saying "everyone has his own truth," about what happened.

In the interview, Schettino again insisted that by guiding the stricken ship to shallower waters near Giglio's port instead of immediately ordering an evacuation he potentially saved lives.

Passengers described a confused and delayed evacuation, with many of the life boats unable to be lowered after the boat listed to one side. Some of the 4,200 aboard jumped into the Mediterranean and swam to the island, while others had to be plucked from the vessel by rescue helicopters hours after the collision.

Some passengers said they were shocked to see that the captain was already ashore when they were being evacuated. Schettino claims he helped direct the evacuation from the island after leaving the ship.

Work has begun to remove the tons of rocky reef embedded into the Concordia's hull, a first step in plans to eventually tow the wreck away from the island.

The whole removal process could take as long as a year.

by Anonymousreply 26607/11/2012

I don't think they'll remove it. Right now it's the hottest tourist attraction

by Anonymousreply 26707/11/2012

The captain belongs in jail.

by Anonymousreply 26807/11/2012

[quote]Right now it's the hottest tourist attraction

On an NPR report from Italy just now, the Mayor of the town said that tourism dollars have dropped by 60%.

by Anonymousreply 26907/14/2012

GROSSETO -- An Italian court on Saturday postponed until Oct. 15 a preliminary hearing seeking to determine charges against those responsible for the Costa Concordia shipwreck that killed 32 crew and passengers.

The court decided to delay the hearing, which will decide whether to indict Concordia's captain and others, in order to examine an expert assessment of audio evidence from the black box data recorder.

Capt. Francesco Schettino's lawyer told reporters outside the courthouse that the audio evidence from the black box confirms his client's version of events.

"Schettino has felt relieved since he had the chance to tell his version of the facts to the judge, but he is also relieved because the audio evidence from the black box confirm his version," Bruno Leporatti said.

Schettino said recently in a TV interview that he was distracted by a telephone call just before the Jan. 13 accident, and that he believed his decision to move the ship closer to shore to shallow waters instead of immediately ordering an evacuation potentially saved lives. Prosecutors allege he sailed too close to an island in a publicity stunt, ramming it into a reef.

Passengers described a confused and delayed evacuation, with many of the life boats unable to be lowered after the ship listed to one side. Some of the 4,200 aboard jumped into the Mediterranean and swam to the island, while others had to be plucked from the vessel by rescue helicopters hours after the collision.

by Anonymousreply 27007/21/2012

GROSSETO, Italy --- The captain blamed for the sinking of the Costa Concordia cruise liner off the Italian coast in January that killed 32 people shook hands with survivors and apologized on Monday at a court hearing to decide if he should face a full trial.

Francesco Schettino appeared relaxed and spoke often to his legal team, the lawyer representing 80 U.S. survivors and family members, said.

A lawyer for the families of those killed said no one should have died.

The 114,500 tonne luxury cruise ship capsized on January 13 after approaching the Tuscan island of Giglio to perform a maneuver close to the shore known as a salute. It struck a rock which tore a gash in its hull.

Schettino has admitted he made mistakes but has accused the company of mishandling the response. He said last week he was suing Costa Cruises, a unit of Carnival Corp., for unfair dismissal following the accident.

Held up to ridicule in Italy and abroad since the disaster, he faces charges of multiple manslaughter and abandoning ship during a chaotic night-time evacuation of 4,200 passengers and crew. Two bodies have still not been recovered. The ship is still sitting half-submerged on a rocky shelf off the island.

It was the first such hearing Schettino had attended.

Luciano Castro, an Italian survivor at the hearing in a theatre in the central town of Grosseto, said Schettino appeared "embarrassed" when they spoke briefly.

"The only thing he said was when I told him that I hope that the truth will soon be established, he said, 'yes, it needs to be established soon'," Castro told reporters.

Two German survivors who attended the hearing said Schettino had shaken their hands and said he was sorry.

by Anonymousreply 27110/15/2012

Lawyers representing the victims' families said they wanted to look beyond Schettino.

"The reason these people died is not because of Captain Schettino, the reason these people died is because of the corporation, the negligence in their practices and safety procedures. There was no reason for anyone to die," said Peter Ronai, a lawyer for the victims' families.

Schettino did not speak during Monday morning's hearing but his lawyers said he accepted blame for the accident and wanted the full truth to be established.

"The captain is doing what is in his right to do, he is conducting his defense," his lawyer Francesco Pepe told reporters outside the closed door hearing.

"It is in his interest that the truth comes out and it is a question of respect, not just for his rights but also the rights of the survivors," he said.

Eight other officers and executives of Costa Cruises, the ship's owner, are also being investigated for their roles in the accident.

The hearings will include the presentation of data taken from the ship's "black box" and an analysis of the accident by a panel of experts.

Castro, who was aboard the ship when it capsized, said: "What I would say to Captain Schettino is first to tell the truth and second to remember when he speaks that there are people looking at him who are still missing loved ones, people who will never be found because of what happened."

by Anonymousreply 27210/15/2012

[quote]He said last week he was suing Costa Cruises, a unit of Carnival Corp., for unfair dismissal following the accident.

Considering that he broke both Italian law and international maritime law, he's lucky he wasn't shot.

by Anonymousreply 27310/15/2012

It was a year ago that this ship ran aground. I remember that at one point the captain claimed he tripped and fell into a lifeboat so that's why he left the ship while people were still in peril aboard the ship.

by Anonymousreply 27401/13/2013

Is the ship salvageable or will it be scrapped?

by Anonymousreply 27501/13/2013

[quote]Is the ship salvageable or will it be scrapped?

It's going to be refloated enough to get it into a port in Sicily, and then scrapped.

by Anonymousreply 27601/29/2013

Is the Captain still running around free?

How about his gal pal the stew?

by Anonymousreply 27701/30/2013

Captain Schettino is going to be arraigned some time in February for charges that include manslaughter.

The jackass is actually suing Costa Crociere for firing him and says that he wants to command another ship some day.

by Anonymousreply 27801/30/2013
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