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The Airbus A-380 Super Jumbo

Recently flew on this beast with high expectations (in coach mind you). Guess what? It sucked hard. The aisles seem narrower and the seats are actually tighter. It was the singularly most uncomfortable flight I have ever had. The food sucked too, worse than usual.

by Anonymousreply 5809/26/2014

Don't use the word "beast" as you have done.

To do so is just, well, beastly.

by Anonymousreply 101/05/2012

Ew, you flew commercial?

by Anonymousreply 201/05/2012

Sounds like you flew Lufthansa...

by Anonymousreply 301/05/2012

Actually, it sounds like OP flew Air Canada, assuming they have one of those. The worst relatively expensive airline in the Western hemisphere whose slogan should be "You pay more for the privilege of being treated with utter indignation!"

by Anonymousreply 401/05/2012

No, it was Air France, an airline I usually sort of like.

by Anonymousreply 501/05/2012

Designed to appeal to the Asian airline industry where integrity has no value.

by Anonymousreply 601/05/2012

seriously? the qantas flights i've had on 'em - one in economy and one in premium economy - were a dream! really great experience and so much roomier than cattle class in a lumbering old 747... (and yeah - fly commercial - and economy! galling i know - but sadly, just not that big an income :( )

by Anonymousreply 701/06/2012

Whenever I fly Airbus, I always have ear problems. You know the kind that force you to keep popping your ear drum over and over. I never have any ear problems with any Boeing models.

I agree with you. Airbus has very strange designs as if they never thought they were designing for human use. Airbus sucks big time.

by Anonymousreply 801/06/2012

Quantus engineers were complaining about cracks in the wing frames. Suggest the whole fleet of A380s be grounded.

Then they suddenly 180ed and said the cracks were not a problem and have been fixed.

by Anonymousreply 1001/07/2012

probably decided that the risk of losing a plane full of a few hundred passengers is worth taking when the alternative is grounding and overhauling a fleet of planes that took many years and many billions of dollars to build. gotta at least fly them until the first crash, try to get their money's worth. even in the event of a crash they could blame it on an electrical storm or even terrorism rather than write off the whole fleet.

by Anonymousreply 1101/07/2012

Is that the one that they can pack 400-500 people on?

by Anonymousreply 1201/07/2012

What r11 said

by Anonymousreply 1301/07/2012

Yes R12, 520 on my flight. R7 must be the size of Kerry Shrug.

by Anonymousreply 1401/07/2012

[quote]Primary users are Emirates, Singapore, Lufthansa and Air France. They all upgraded their premium product offerings with the new plane.

Someone in here once called the A380 a "Mecca-wagon."

by Anonymousreply 1601/07/2012

Air France using the A-380 is no surprise since Airbus itself is a consortium of European governments.

That said, I have heard a number of pilots saying how they do not like to fly Airbus aircraft. The aircraft tries to countermand the pilots decisions on a regular basis because of the level of automation present on them.

by Anonymousreply 1701/07/2012

R17 considering that the majority of crashes are due to pilot error I'd say that's a good thing.

I forget the source but i once read that modern aircraft should have just two crew in the cockpit:a pilot, and a dog. The dog is there to bite the pilot if he tries to touch anything.

by Anonymousreply 1801/07/2012

[quote][R17] considering that the majority of crashes are due to pilot error I'd say that's a good thing.

The crash of the Air France flight from Rio to Paris is a prime example of that.

There was definitely a failure in the instruments but it did not have to result in the plane crashing into the ocean. In fact, it lasted less than a minute.

The junior pilot continued to pull back on the controls in an attempt to pull the plane out of the stall.

Had he simply let go, the aircraft would have returned to level flight.

by Anonymousreply 1901/07/2012

[quote]considering that the majority of crashes are due to pilot error I'd say that's a good thing.

UHM.. NO. Most crashes are due to bad pilot training, because pilots rely too much on the instruments and the technology doing everything, even if there's something wrong. It's easier to make the plane take care of it itself than them stepping in. Or at least that's what they think. I have been watching that plane crash show on National Geographic, and they keep saying that pilots could have saved the plane if they didn't rely so much on the technology and if they actually took over the plane to manually fly it if something was happening. They have issued better pilot training now, and they have simulators where pilots manually fly the plane if something is wrong, if the instruments have failed or something like that.

I mean.. sure, technology on a plane is good to a certain degree. It's needed when it's on autopilot and all of that stuff, but the pilots should know how to take over and manually fly the plane in an emergency, and not just rely on the technology.

by Anonymousreply 2001/07/2012

Boeing doesn't have the kind of sophisticated technology being used in Airbus planes. That's why the innovation is all taking place at EADS.

Boeing's idea of innovation is plastic planes built by cheap labor (AKA non-union plants).

by Anonymousreply 2101/07/2012

Air France A-380, Upper level Business class, Dulles to Paris...Fabulous

by Anonymousreply 2201/07/2012

I've flown on the Emirates, Qantas and Singapore Airlines A380s a number of times and I like how quiet the aircraft is. Better air quality in the cabin too.

by Anonymousreply 2301/07/2012

I always hate flying in Airbus planes. The ride is ALWAYS rougher and less comfortable.

If I get a choice, I'll pay more to fly in a Boeing plan.

by Anonymousreply 2401/07/2012

Yes, r21, the innovation really does seem to be happening at EADS!

by Anonymousreply 2501/07/2012

Certified up to 853.

Ugh! Yuck

How many people were on board your flight, OP (approx)?

by Anonymousreply 2601/07/2012

[quote]Air France A-380, Upper level Business class, Dulles to Paris...Fabulous

With those angled seats?

Are you kidding me?

by Anonymousreply 2701/07/2012

I recall Airbus demonstrating it's first aircraft in Germany and then watching as said aircraft leveled itself out right into the forest.

Pretty funny actually.

Then there's the A330 that fell out of the sky in the middle of the ocean. Air France Flight 447 from Brazil to Paris.

It's Pitot tubes froze over and the pilots didn't know what to do. So yes, pilot error however if you're going to automate an aircraft make it so either the aircraft flies itself or the pilot flies it, not some hybrid between the two.

by Anonymousreply 2801/07/2012

R21, I'd like to see you go head-to-head with a roomful of Boeing engineers and talk about their technology issues.

by Anonymousreply 2901/07/2012

[quote]Then there's the A330 that fell out of the sky in the middle of the ocean. Air France Flight 447 from Brazil to Paris.

Duh.

by Anonymousreply 3001/07/2012

r10 the statement was made by QANTAS management and not the engineers. There is a difference.

by Anonymousreply 3101/07/2012

R31 - when I said "they" in the second paragraph, I meant QANTAS the company. I'm sure management overrode engineering's concerns, but engineering has the habit of rolling over easily, usually out of fear.

by Anonymousreply 3201/08/2012

R19 R30 The investigation isn't over on AF447. So far it sounds like disagreement between pitot tubes, those gizmo's that tell the pilots (and the computer!) what the airspeed is. Guaranteed crash.

by Anonymousreply 3301/08/2012

I've long been suspicious of Airbus planes and found them uncomfortable. I worked in aviation training some years ago and then the pilots I spoke to were very unhappy with Airbus and the training provided.

However, I flew long-haul in economy on an Emirates A-380 and found it super comfortable. Mind you, I did have an exit leg room seat and no-one beside me.

by Anonymousreply 3401/08/2012

R24, my experience is exactly the opposite. I mostly fly on Airbuses and had to take a return flight with Boeings recently - much bumpier than my usual flights, narrower seats and the ambience was generally not as pleasant as on an Airbus.

by Anonymousreply 3501/08/2012

There were around 540 people on my A-380 flight. I will say it was definitely a quieter plane, but that was the only positive.

by Anonymousreply 3601/08/2012

[quote][R19] [R30] The investigation isn't over on AF447. So far it sounds like disagreement between pitot tubes, those gizmo's that tell the pilots (and the computer!) what the airspeed is. Guaranteed crash.

Are you arguing that the junior pilot holding back on the stick did not cause the crash?

Seriously?

Despite overwhelming evidence, including transcripts and flight data recordings, that this was the cause, you want to argue that there was an unrecoverable failure which led to the crash?

That's total horseshit.

The autopilot disconnected, as it should do when the plane's systems can no longer make sense of the data it receives, and the pilot could not fly the plane manually. The crash resulted as the pilot kept the plane's nose elevated which is precisely what one does not do in a stall.

When a plane's systems call out "Stall" dozens of times over a short period and a pilot does not recognize that he is doing the one thing which essentially guarantees a catastrophic situation, then the cause is pilot error following an equipment failure which was rectified within a couple of minutes.

You might want to do a little research next time.

by Anonymousreply 3701/08/2012

And the ins and outs of r37 all point to training, of which pilots are receiving less. When United and Continental merged, pilots were given plane manuals to READ (on their own time) but no extra time in the simulator. The Pilots' Union is squawking, but no one is listening...

As with rest times, the lack of which caused the Buffalo crash, nothing will be done about the training issue until another plane drops onto a neighborhood.

by Anonymousreply 3801/08/2012

I heard that Airbus puts activated charcoal in the seat cushions as a "fart absorber."

Any truth to this? If so, good for Airbus -- wish Boeing would do it.

I sat next a hefty slattern on a trip once and she was extremely "windy!"

On another note, whoever came up with the "Airbus" name needs to be taken out and horsewhipped. The word "Bus" has the wrong connotation for air travel.

As stupid as "Bonefish Grill" for a seafood restaurant chain -- what were they thinking?!

by Anonymousreply 3901/08/2012

[quote]Boeing doesn't have the kind of sophisticated technology being used in Airbus planes. That's why the innovation is all taking place at EADS.

Nobody is interested in factually and grammatically inaccurate opinions that come from an idiot like you. That's why you can't even construct a proper cause-effect sequence from two simple sentences.

by Anonymousreply 4001/08/2012

[quote]Nobody is interested in factually and grammatically inaccurate opinions that come from an idiot like you. That's why you can't even construct a proper cause-effect sequence from two simple sentences.

Be kind.

He is probably French. English is not his first language.

In that case, the errors in grammar are understandable and the idiocy fully explained.

by Anonymousreply 4101/08/2012

R37 Funny how in the DL you never know whom you are calling horseshit on or what they may actually know. If you can recover a jetliner when you have no earthly idea of airspeed and cannot trust any of your other instruments or warnings, then please tell us all how you accomplish this miracle.

Three of the most recent major crashes have involved this ancient piece of technology which a piece of tape can render useless. By now, you'd think Someone would come up with a better mechanism.

by Anonymousreply 4201/08/2012

R42, please cite one article published since the voice and flight data recorders were released which does not attribute the crash to a stall which was due to a simple error by a junior pilot and which was corrected by the captain far too late to prevent the crash,

There is no longer any doubt as to the junior pilot's responsibility.'

But, please, enlighten us.

by Anonymousreply 4301/08/2012

I flew on Qantas A380 and was impressed with the aircraft. The 380 seemed to be the most "buttoned up" EAD product. There were 450 on my flight, and it was sold out. I was in coach and found it rather tight compared to the seating on other smaller EAD craft, but not strikingly so. The plane was amazingly quiet, and in rougher air, really seemed to smooth compared to some other planes like the 777 or 747/400's I often fly.

The load on those wings seems tremendous, but those wings are pretty tremendous too. I'm not an aeronautical engineer, but I am a mechanical engineer and the wing positioning seems odd. Seems as though greater efficiency would have been achieved if the wing was one deck higher, but that would have played hell on the interior of the craft.

Really loved the view from the TV camera in the vertical stabilizer.

by Anonymousreply 4401/08/2012

And there's even more to report!

by Anonymousreply 4501/08/2012

And more...hey, look at all of the innovation at EADS!

Those cracks on the wings must be part of a grand design plan!

by Anonymousreply 4601/09/2012

You know Boeing and Airbus and Aeroflot are just a hair-breadth away from sabotaging each other's planes.

by Anonymousreply 4701/09/2012

[quote]You know Boeing and Airbus and Aeroflot are just a hair-breadth away from sabotaging each other's planes.

Aeroflot is an airline, dear.

Its fleet consists almost entirely of Airbus and Boeing planes.

It has retained 10 Russian-made aircraft (including some IL-86s) but otherwise its fleet is Western-made.

It does have 50 Irkut MS-21 on order. That is a Russian-manufactured plane designed to replace the Tu-154.

Got it?

by Anonymousreply 4801/09/2012

They wouldn't be above sabotaging planes R48. Then there Bombardier, DeHavilland, and Embraer, what happened to them?

by Anonymousreply 4901/09/2012

I like airplanes bump

by Anonymousreply 5001/10/2012

Korean Air’s A380 to feature three bars

850 drunk passengers!

by Anonymousreply 5102/23/2013

They may not have that much discretion with respect to the aisles, but the seat pitch/comfort varies by airlines, it is not nec. a function of your being on an Airbus A-380 Super Jumbo. The airlines chooses the seats.

by Anonymousreply 5202/23/2013

Bump (over turbulence)

by Anonymousreply 5302/23/2013

The A-380 coach seats are narrower and uncomfortable. I flew on Air France and it sucked. I didn't notice anymore bumps than usual though. The aisles also seem narrower too. I usually like Air France too.

by Anonymousreply 5402/23/2013

So what's with the cracking wings?

I used to miss flying, but not any more...

by Anonymousreply 5502/23/2013

[quote]Boeing doesn't have the kind of sophisticated technology being used in Airbus planes. That's why the innovation is all taking place at EADS.

LOL!!!!

by Anonymousreply 5602/23/2013

Airbus has so much political power, they can cover up incidents.

by Anonymousreply 5702/24/2013

Qantas, Singapore Air, Korean Air, British air and Air France A380s have now been joined by Asiana Air at LAX. I think it flies in a 580 seat configuration

by Anonymousreply 5809/26/2014
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