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Woody Allen's 'Manhattan' (1979)

Personally, I have mixed feelings about it.

Mariel Hemmingway drowned every scene she was in with her Minnie Mouse voice and that great 'climactic romantic moment' when Woody goes to find her before she leaves for London makes me feel sick.

But there was a lot I liked and some very funny lines.

The unfaithful husband, played by, Michael Murphy, was ripped straight off from Unmarried Woman, he even used the same actor for goodness sake.

What do you think of it?

by Anonymousreply 4811/18/2012

Creepy. Woody casts himself to fuck a gIrl who looks and sounds 12.

by Anonymousreply 110/29/2011

Great film.

by Anonymousreply 210/30/2011

I never understood why he cast Hemingway. Yes, the voice was horrendous, but mostly - she's a [italic]really[/italic] bad actress.

Lot's of good things in it. One of my favorites (of his) actually. Could have been improved by 50% with a different actress in that role.

by Anonymousreply 310/30/2011

Nicely photographed. But 32 years later, there's really no THERE there, is there?

by Anonymousreply 410/30/2011

[quote] I never understood why he cast Hemingway.

The ugly, old perv wanted to fuck her.

by Anonymousreply 510/30/2011

one of the most beautiful films ever made

by Anonymousreply 710/30/2011

[quote]Nicely photographed. But 32 years later, there's really no THERE there, is there?

I enjoyed it at the time, lovely cinematography and music. That might have been Meryl's prettiest moment on screen. But I've never felt the urge to watch it again.

by Anonymousreply 810/30/2011

Meryl is quite good in her utter disdain for Woody. I love the hair all in one side too!

by Anonymousreply 910/30/2011

I love the look on Woody's face at the end of the movie when Mariel's character says he should learn to have a little more faith in people, it says a lot without him saying a thing. I love the look of this movie and the music and a few scenes here and there (the ending especially) but it's not one that I watch over and over like Crimes and Misdemeanors, Love and Death or Hannah and her Sisters.

by Anonymousreply 1010/30/2011

Stardust memories is better

by Anonymousreply 1110/30/2011

I would also term it a great movie.

by Anonymousreply 1210/30/2011

The casting of Hemingway was good because if she was more a conventionally hot young girl then Woody would have looked like more of a perv. Heminway's gangly quality worked better.

I agree with the above poster. I make a point of seeing CRIMES AND MISDEMEANORS and HANNAH AND HER SISTERS every year but don't with MANHATTAN.

by Anonymousreply 1310/30/2011

Woody Allen was the best friend to New York real estate speculators ever. His films played a huge part in remaking the image of Manhattan from the dirty, crime-ridden hole of the John Lindsay era into the glamorous enclave of the affluent elite under Giuliani and Bloomberg, mainly by pricing the poor and middle-class into the outer boroughs and beyond. And then Woody's own public image got sucked into Soon-Yi Previn's pussy and he had to find other places to make films in.

by Anonymousreply 1410/30/2011

I liked the music.

by Anonymousreply 1510/30/2011

"The casting of Hemingway was good because if she was more a conventionally hot young girl then Woody would have looked like more of a perv. Heminway's gangly quality worked better."

Any young girl would have made him look like a perv. Like every straight man, Allen thinks he can punch above his weight when it comes to women. While that may work in real life because of his money and fame, in his movies it's cringe-inducing.

by Anonymousreply 1610/30/2011

LOVE the opening sequence.

by Anonymousreply 1710/30/2011

R14 is correct. And part and parcel of Allen's sanitized, rarified view of NYC was the notable absence of non-whites, white ethnics (other than Jews), working-class, and G&L characters from almost all of his movies.

When Spike Lee was first on the scene and critics kept calling him "the black Woody Allen," he took exception. And they wondered why he wasn't more grateful for the comparison...

by Anonymousreply 1810/30/2011

So did the entire Academy want to fuck her when they nominated her for an Oscar for this movie?

It is indeed a great movie.

by Anonymousreply 1910/30/2011

"What about Vincent Van GOCCCCCCCCCGHHHH?!!"

by Anonymousreply 2010/30/2011

I love the scene in the Museum of Modern Art where Diane dislikes the art Woody and Mariel like and then loves the art they hate. I've met *many* people like her who always has to have the opposite opinion.

by Anonymousreply 2110/30/2011

and Woody gets insecure because his taste and self-image is thrown into question by what he perceives as Diane's utter contempt. Naturally, he then becomes attracted to her!

by Anonymousreply 2210/30/2011

Joan Didion's very interesting take:

In fact the paradigm for the action in these recent Woody Allen movies is high school. The characters in Manhattan and Annie Hall and Interiors are, with one exception, presented as adults, as sentient men and women in the most productive years of their lives, but their concerns and conversations are those of clever children, “class brains,” acting out a yearbook fantasy of adult life.

Full piece at the link.

by Anonymousreply 2310/30/2011

It's clever the way Woody & Diane meet again, at a fundraiser. He sees her differently in a different light. It's very real and romantic. Then they go and sit under the bridge. It's the scenes with Mariel that drag. We know now why he cast her.

by Anonymousreply 2410/30/2011

He's a dirty old pervert.

by Anonymousreply 2510/30/2011

I liked Mariel in the film. She was sweet and shy - a good contrast to the more worldly Diane character.

by Anonymousreply 2610/30/2011

Judy Davis knew how to put him in his place:

by Anonymousreply 2710/30/2011

Mariel Hemingway may have been lovely and delicate-looking as a young girl, but she's quite mannish and horsey-looking now. Here is a recent pic of her posing with her daughter. She can't even be regarded as a "handsome woman."

by Anonymousreply 2811/04/2011

I'm surprised Manhattan gets such a short thread on DL.

I loved reading the link at R23.

by Anonymousreply 2911/17/2012

I grew up poor in Appalachia and this movie was a glass of water. It's not perfect, but it's beautiful and thoughtful and it would not be made today.

by Anonymousreply 3011/17/2012

The gorgeous b and w photography and the Gershwin music make me swoon. And it's funny and insightful and touching.

by Anonymousreply 3111/17/2012

Best use of the word "homunculus" in a screenplay ever.

by Anonymousreply 3211/17/2012

For a long time, *Manhattan* was one of my favorite films. Diane Keaton is great! Say what you will about Allen's misogyny - and it's everywhere evident - he gives women room to deliver performances that other directors don't, what, "coax forth?" Goldie Hawn in *Everyone Says I Love You*! Hawn is great in that movie. Judy Davis is wonderful in *Husbands and Wives*. Anybody else who tried to play "unhinged" to that degree would have been intolerable. Allen made Dianne Wiest's career happen. He got Louise Lasser. And nobody else figured out that Mia Farrow could do that role in *Broadway Danny Rose*. Mira Sorvino has never been good in anything else. Penelope Cruz, Samantha Morton, Marion Cotillard have hardly been better in anything else.

It's a smart insight to say he made New York real estate glamorous again, and we can partly credit the city's devastating over-gentrification to Allen

I don't know how I'd feel about *Manhattan* now. I haven't seen it in about 10 years.

by Anonymousreply 3311/17/2012

Marrying that stunning cinematography to Gershwin's sublime symphony was inspired.

Beautiful opening - not so sure how the entire film holds up now but I give it the benefit. This and Manhattan Murder Mystery (Keaton and Alda are brilliant) are really great examples of his work at either end of his career.

by Anonymousreply 3411/17/2012

*Deconstructing Harry* is my favorite of his films. It's amazing how many characters and how many different little stories he can fit into 90 minutes.

by Anonymousreply 3511/17/2012

[quote]It's a smart insight to say he made New York real estate glamorous again, and we can partly credit the city's devastating over-gentrification to Allen

The gentrification of New York happened YEARS after Annie Hall & Manhattan.

He may have played his part in making people falling in love with NY and see it more positively when it was so down in the 70s and contributing to the 70s boom in NY film making.

by Anonymousreply 3611/17/2012

[quote]This and Manhattan Murder Mystery (Keaton and Alda are brilliant)

Really? I thought Keaton was pitiful in it...she was called in to replace Mia, after all the Soon Yi drama, at the last minute and it shows.

by Anonymousreply 3711/17/2012

Didion called him out on his pretentiousness, but people preferred to take a romantic view of the movie.

Didion was right, I think.

by Anonymousreply 3811/17/2012

[quote] Penelope Cruz, Samantha Morton, Marion Cotillard have hardly been better in anything else.

Penelope Cruz - Volver

Sam Morton - Morvern Callar, Jesus' Son

Marion Cotillard - La vie en rose, Rust and Bone

by Anonymousreply 3911/17/2012

r36, are you Dr. No? NYC just about went bankrupt in the mid-70s. Ed Koch started his first mayoral term on Jan 1, 1978. He was Mayor all through the Reagan years and into Bush I. Koch is the dude who started the big pimping out of Manhattan to real estate barons. Allen's *Manhattan* was released in late April 1979. Two years after the "summer of sam," 1977. Allen helped begin the rehabilitation of Manhattan and international glamor spot. The "I Heart New York" ad campaign was launched in '77, a year before Koch's election. The selling-of-Manhattan started at that moment, and has culminated in Mayor Mike's global capital, a city devastated not by poverty but wealth.

by Anonymousreply 4011/17/2012

the dearly departed "elaine's"

by Anonymousreply 4111/17/2012

[quote] I thought Keaton was pitiful in it...she was called in to replace Mia, after all the Soon Yi drama

I LOVED it, she's zany and silly, probably half-improving considering the conditions.

by Anonymousreply 4211/17/2012

Thank you r42! The chemistry with those two was fabulous. I saw it at an amazing old movie house that was closing down soon after - they gave me the poster.

by Anonymousreply 4311/17/2012

this is the radio ad, part of an enormous campaign, that many credit with saving the city. even tho it's not Gershwin.

by Anonymousreply 4411/17/2012

We did our bit too, R44

by Anonymousreply 4511/17/2012

here is the original

by Anonymousreply 4611/17/2012

The opening scenes with the Gershwin soundtrack is gorgeous. They showed it for free Sept. 11, 2002, and it was perfect.

by Anonymousreply 4711/17/2012

One of the greatest films of the 70's, and that's saying a lot.

by Anonymousreply 4811/18/2012
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