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How Many Americans Own A Landline?

Anyone know? Any percentages out there? I have one. I would never feel comfortable with just a cell phone, even though I have one of those too.

by Anonymousreply 12607/11/2013

What's the population over age 70?

by Anonymousreply 107/16/2011

We have one. With caller ID so we can ignore the in-laws. (His family.)

by Anonymousreply 207/16/2011

I have one. It's not that expensive with a cable TV/internet package. I don't understand *not* having one. What happens if you lose your cell phone?

by Anonymousreply 307/16/2011

If it weren't for land lines, conservative right-wing old people wouldn't be able to answer polls in the middle of the day and give their half-assed opinions on everything, making "poll results" national news.

by Anonymousreply 407/16/2011

I have one but I rarely use it. I mostly just have it for my fax machine. Occasionally, I use it to call my cell phone if I've misplaced it somewhere in the house. I don't answer any calls that come in on it because it's always telemarketers or my father who is bat shit insane and only calls to berate me for imagined slights.

by Anonymousreply 507/16/2011

I do with an answering machine.

by Anonymousreply 607/16/2011

I don't technically have a "landline" -- the service is through Vonage -- but I do have a "home phone."%0D %0D When I'm home, that's what I prefer for conversations. I have an Android smart phone that I love, but it's not very comfortable for use in conversations more than a few minutes.

by Anonymousreply 707/16/2011

I have one. It's now part of my internet/phone package. It hardly costs anything. I prefer it to my mobile. The sound is WAY cleaner. In fact, I tell my friends to try me at home first, not on my mobile. And if I'm home and get a call on my mobile I switch to my land line.

by Anonymousreply 807/16/2011

Why would I own a landmine? That's a terrible thing to own!

by Anonymousreply 907/16/2011

Im 57 and I own one, but don't know the percentage.

by Anonymousreply 1007/16/2011

I get almost no reception on my cell phone in my apartment so I'm forced to keep my landline. Thanks AT&T!

by Anonymousreply 1107/16/2011

I broke my phone and never purchased a new one. After continuing to pay the bill for 3 years, I finally decided it was time to shut it down.

by Anonymousreply 1207/16/2011

35 here and I own have a landline.

by Anonymousreply 1307/16/2011

I don't have a landline, haven't for a few years.

by Anonymousreply 1407/16/2011

R11, there are other companies to use besides ATT.

by Anonymousreply 1507/16/2011

I have one but it's a necessity. I work from home and currently the phone connection has to be accessed via a lanline. The convenience of not battling traffic costs me $50 a month.

by Anonymousreply 1607/16/2011

I have one, but it is call-fwd'd to my cell. I haven't actually used the "real" phone at all for several years. I know, dumb, but it's the last number I memorized.

by Anonymousreply 1707/16/2011

No one I know in my age group has one. Not an exaggeration, literally no one.

by Anonymousreply 1807/16/2011

I only have a land line. I despise cell phones.

by Anonymousreply 1907/16/2011

For me, cellphone reception is a symbol of the mediocrity we have learned to put up with. I have one in my car just in case of an emergency.

by Anonymousreply 2007/16/2011

Cable-provided landline (VOIP), no cell phone, 56, retired.

Life runs just fine w/o a cell.

by Anonymousreply 2107/16/2011

Cell phone - I'm not home during the day & was only getting pollsters and advertisers on the landline anyway so why pay for that?

by Anonymousreply 2207/16/2011

[quote]I have one but I rarely use it. I mostly just have it for my fax machine.

What's a "fax" machine, Grampaw?

by Anonymousreply 2307/16/2011

I recall reading that 20% of Americans have a cell as their only phone service.

by Anonymousreply 2407/16/2011

I'm 50, which means dead in gayland, but... un-tethered last year with only a cell.%0D %0D Next step, abandon laptop and go iPad only

by Anonymousreply 2507/16/2011

We have a landline. We are old (I'm in my 50's, he's in his 60's). I wanted to get rid of the landline but he says no. Also, the burglar alarm apparently only works if you have a landline. I never answer the landline phone, though. It's nothing but junk calls. If somebody wants to reach me, they can or text me on my cell.

by Anonymousreply 2607/16/2011

The statistics:%0D %0D landline - 74%%0D %0D mobile only - 25%%0D %0D Skewed heavily by age, and the trend much in favor of mobile-only.%0D %0D From 2009 data:%0D %0D [quote]According to a study by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), one out of every four American families does not own a landline phone. Instead, 25 percent of American households are only using mobile phones. Further reinforcing the primacy of mobile phones, the study found that 15 percent of families that do own landlines receive all or almost all calls through wireless phones.%0D %0D [quote]The study was carried out between July and December of 2009 and included information from more than 21,000 American families.%0D %0D And at link May 2010 Pew Research Center data on Americans' perceptions of need for technology.%0D %0D The few other articles I checked that report on different studies suggest very similar numbers.

by Anonymousreply 2707/16/2011

What's all this talk about owing landmines? Owning landmines is dangerous, you could lose a finger. Why would you want to own a landmine? It's just foolish.. What? Oh that's different, ...never mind.

by Anonymousreply 2807/16/2011

Looks like the answer is about 75% overall, but about 35% if you are under 30.

by Anonymousreply 2907/16/2011

We got rid of ours a few months ago and don't miss it. We also got rid of those annoying sales cold calls and other nonsense.

by Anonymousreply 3007/16/2011

Good one, r28.

by Anonymousreply 3107/16/2011

I have vonage in addition to a cell, but vonage is not a landline it's a computer line.

by Anonymousreply 3207/16/2011

I have a landline and a cell phone. The landline reception is perfect, the cell phone reception is not. I like having a land line for emergencies and for phone calls where I'd like to hear what the other person is saying. I won't be giving it up anytime soon.

by Anonymousreply 3307/16/2011

the reception of my iPhone is crap in my apartment. Moreover, I hate the poor sound quality of cell phones. I'm not even a big phone talker anyhow.

by Anonymousreply 3407/16/2011

I'm 55. Haven't had a landline since 2004. Why pay for both? I've never had a problem with reception where I've lived (I have Sprint).

by Anonymousreply 3507/16/2011

52 -- and I haven't had a landline for years. And as I always remind them, I had T-Mobile back when it was VoiceStream.

by Anonymousreply 3607/16/2011

I have a landline. I can't have a conversation on a cell with this bad reception we all have.

by Anonymousreply 3707/16/2011

Depends on what you mean by "landline.". If you mean a telephone that doesn't leave home, then the answer is -- lots and lots.

But to me a "landline" is a phone that doesn't fail when the electricity goes out. If your home-based phone is hooked up via cable, it goes out when the electricity goes out.

On 9/11 my phone landline and the separate landline my computer was attached to never failed while our cellphones didn't work and our TV's cable occasionally went out. A lot of people with cable-based phones couldn't use them.

by Anonymousreply 3807/16/2011

I want to get rid of my landline, but I gave the number to Jake several years ago and I have to keep it just in case he calls.

by Anonymousreply 3907/16/2011

We still have one for international calls since the cell rates are insane. If and when Skype gets a little better we'll probably drop it.

by Anonymousreply 4007/16/2011

Didn't Lady Diana attempt to ban these?

by Anonymousreply 4107/16/2011

I wish I'd kept mine.

I'm so fucking sick of the crap reception and dropped calls on my AT&T iPhone.

by Anonymousreply 4207/16/2011

My only phone is a landline, I had a cell for years and learned to hate it. Now when I see the droids connected to their cell at the hip, I shake my head and remind myself I made a great decision. Nothing is that urgent, my residence land line and email serve me well. I admit at times I miss a cell; that envy usually passes very quickly.

by Anonymousreply 4307/16/2011

Ditto to R8 entire post. Landline has a better sound and my cordless battery last longer before needing to be recharged.

by Anonymousreply 4407/16/2011

This year, after not having a landline for 8 years, I let Comcast talk me into getting a landline "for just a few bucks more a month, just in case." It was one of those triple service deals, where, if you get cable, Internet and phone, it's supposed to be a better bargain.

I had it for about six weeks. It didn't ring once, I didn't have occasion to ever use it, and I eventually canceled it.

by Anonymousreply 4507/16/2011

How do people without cell phones survive in the modern career world? A cell is a neccesity in most jobs now.

by Anonymousreply 4607/16/2011

[quote]the modern career world%0D %0D Define, please?%0D %0D Do you mean 80 hours weeks doing things that probably don't need to be done in the first place?

by Anonymousreply 4707/16/2011

I do OK, r46. I am the only person I know who does not have a cell phone. Sometimes I get strange looks, sometimes people say, "Good for you, I wish I could give mine up."

If it becomes an issue for me I can acquire a cell in ten minutes, I'm three years free of cell/text services. I do admit at first I felt disconnected, now I feel free.

by Anonymousreply 4807/16/2011

The FCC has the data. 27% of households are cellular only, which means that about 70% have landlines. (Yeah, about 2-3% of people have no phone at all.)

Techie nerds always overestimate the various trends, and nowhere more than in telecommunications. People change their telephone habits much more slowly than you think.

Landline is still by far the predominant way people use the phone in their house. It's not all iPhones, kids. Ain't even close.

by Anonymousreply 4907/16/2011

[quote]I never answer the landline phone, though. It's nothing but junk calls.

You can eliminate everything but political and charitable calls by putting yourself on the "do not call" list.

by Anonymousreply 5007/16/2011

I still have one.

by Anonymousreply 5107/16/2011

I hate cell phones. I have to admit, I don't understand why we always have to be connected.

by Anonymousreply 5207/16/2011

I have one because I have DSL for internet. But I only use the actual line for my DSL, DVR and a fax machine. I do have a phone connected to it in case of emergency but I never use the phone.

by Anonymousreply 5307/16/2011

I prefer land line AND I prefer analog phones.

by Anonymousreply 5407/16/2011

I went landless in 2000 and found it easy. I did it again this year and both on the computer and phone, the reception without lines is terrible.%0D

by Anonymousreply 5507/16/2011

I've got one of each. I use the cellphone much more, but when I really want to hear someone I will use the landline. See, I don't have a "smart phone," and have found that AT&T's quality gets worse every year because they're squeezing voice in favor of data.

Does anyone have any comparative experience on voice quality between AT&T, Verizon, and Sprint? I'm thinking of switching to Verizon once my AT&T contract ends. But I'm also thinking that maybe the voice service will improve once the T-Mobile merger goes through, because it will give AT&T more bandwidth that they can use to address the call quality problems.

by Anonymousreply 5607/16/2011

[quote]I use the cellphone much more, but when I really want to hear someone I will use the landline.%0D %0D Why would you be having a conversation with someone you don't want to hear?

by Anonymousreply 5707/16/2011

"No one I know in my age group has one. Not an exaggeration, literally no one."

Did you survey literally every one of them?

by Anonymousreply 5807/16/2011

I have a landline mostly for emergencies. I have sick elderly relatives, and I have to have a phone that always works, also, half the time I leave my cell in the car or someplace.

Also, somebody I know has a cell that constantly drops calls and cuts in and out to the point that it sounds like a throwback to Thomas Edison, or a tin can with a string, would be an improvement. There's no excuse for putting up with that kind of shitty connection for every call. She doesn't have a landline.

by Anonymousreply 5907/16/2011

[quote]Why would you be having a conversation with someone you don't want to hear?

Half my relatives, actually. But seriously, my point was that landline call quality is much, much better. I give everyone my landline number, and when I'm home the landline doesn't forward to the cellphone so I get incoming calls that way. Much better quality.

The other thing is that cellphones won't rest on your shoulder like regular phones will. I've tried using a Bluetooth earpiece, but everyone complains that they can't hear me. You've got a bad cellular call connecting through Bluetooth, which can be dicey.

So I got an old-fashioned corded headset for the cellphone, which looks stupid but works great. The other issue with cellphones, at least the smartphones, is that they're all touch screens, which means you can't dial by feel, and means you wind up making errors if you put it against your head.

Bottom line is that a cellphone is a sort of necessary evil for me. The calls suck, and they're prone to odd behavior. But they're portable. So it's landline at home, cellphone everywhere else.

Oh, and iPhones make me laugh. Leave it to Apple to make a phone that sucks at calls, and leave it to Apple's fashion addled customers to accept it.

by Anonymousreply 6007/16/2011

I have an old time landline.

The last time there was a blackout here in NY, this was about 8 years ago, I can't remember exactly when, the landline worked just fine.

The cell communication was down for over 24 hours. All my friends, and family, who only have cells weren't able to communicate. Imagine the panic, these people practically have those damn cell phones glued to their ears 24/7! They were having meltdowns.

I have two landlines. They are wireless, one has an answering machine, the second is on a remote cradle at my desk in the living room.

My co-op's buzzer system will only work if you have a landline, so, for me, it's needed.

If you have Intenet based phone service through a cable company, the cable guy has to install a special switch to the phone modem, or whatever they use for their phone service, in order for the co-op's buzzer system to work.

As another poster noted, if the electricity goes down and you have your phone service through cable, the phone will not work.

by Anonymousreply 6107/16/2011

(Warning: Heavy geek shit ahead.)

By the way, because of what I used to do for a living I can tell you why landline call quality is better.

Two issues. One is dropping of calls, which has always been an issue for cellular. Several reasons. One is that radio waves, by their nature, are funky. You can move three feet, and the reception will vary by 1,000-fold or more. It's the nature of the beast, and even the best digital tricks can't solve all of it.

Also, when traffic levels in general rise, the cellular carriers will allocate service differentially to different classes of users and kinds of traffic. Dirty little secret of the industry is that voice is an ugly stepchild.

The other big issue is "vocodig," or the encoding of voices into a digital format. Landlines are still largely analog on the residential end. Voices are turned into digits at the switch, or maybe before that at what's called a digital loop carrier. The encoding method allocates 32 Kb/s (kilobits per second) to voices, a standard that's more than 50 years old from when AT&T ran the whole shootin' match.

There is no reason for the landline operators to muck with that. They have all the bandwidth they will ever need for voice. There is no reason to use it more efficiently. The whole transmission network is fiber, and it is virtually impossible to convey in words just how much capacity there is. And because the access portion from the switch out to the home is still analog and was long ago engineered for high quality, and has no competing use in the frequency band dedicated to voice, there is every reason to leave well enough alone.

Even if there was some reason to want to conserve frequency, it would take a gigantic amount of spending to implement. Every landline handset, and all the electronics in switches, digital loop carriers, and the side of your house, would have to be made all-digital. It would cost megabucks, and for what?

On the wireless side, however, it's very different. Their access network, from the switch to the handset, is a wireless shared-frequency environment. It is also digital all the way to the endpoint. Bandwidth is crowded, computing power is cheap, and the whole network thus can be engineered to squeeze voice if needed. Voice calls can be dropped or assigned to a lower-probability service class, and the amount of bandwidth allocated to a single voice can be squeezed.

Re-enter "vocoding," or digital voice encoding. On the landline system, a voice gets 32 Kb/s, but wireless systems will squeeze voices to 8 Kb/s or even less. That's why, even when your cellular call isn't dropped, the voice on the other end often sounds tinny, fuzzy, or otherwise indistinct. They are squeezing voice because to make space for those fuckin' iPhone users.

One more thing, now that I'm being so pedantic. Cellphones automatically adjust the volume of voices. This means you don't need to yell into the god damn thing. In fact, yelling does no good. Your phone will automatically tone it down as part of the analog-to-digital conversion. I really wish the cellular providers would tell this to people, as part of a campaign to reduce "cell yell."

by Anonymousreply 6207/16/2011

"How do people without cell phones survive in the modern career world? A cell is a neccesity in most jobs now."

Are you serious? Cells are NOT a neccessity!

How many people, except perhaps doctors, lawyers, real estate agents, fashion editors and others who might not be tied to their desks all day at work, need to be tracked down ALL day? Not many. Most of the phone conversations overhead are not very important.

I think the cell phone manufacturers have sold consumers a nonsensical bill of goods re 'needing' cell phones. Way too many people have bought into it!

As another poster stated, nothing is all that urgent that we need to be connected all the time! I've been working from home for the last 7 years, most of my work related communication is through emails.

The only reason I have a cell is because my parents are old and ill, my cell is actually for emergencies and when I'm out buying items for my parents and I might to need to ask them a question. Only 5 people have my cell number.

Like most people in this economy, I don't need another unnecessary monthly bill. The cell I have was the cheapest I could find, it's a TracPhone by Motorola. There is no monthly fee, you simply pre-pay for minutes. I pay for yearly minutes.

This cell doesn't do anything but receive and make calls. I can't surf the Net, can't take a photo and I never text. To me these are things we really don't 'need' to be doing on a phone.

by Anonymousreply 6307/16/2011

R49, YOU ROCK!

by Anonymousreply 6407/16/2011

Everything you say is true R63 except to the nutty boss who wants to keep his people on a leash

by Anonymousreply 6507/16/2011

I hate a cell. I wish I could have a hand-held object that would only be a small computer and deliver texts, then I'd never had the interest or need in "calling" other people. Wanna call? call my landline, it's better anyway.

by Anonymousreply 6607/16/2011

If you have any use for a cell, such as R63 points out, or, in my case I drive a lot at night and want one to be able to call for help if I break down, then WHY would anyone pay a second bill for a landline that only works from one location?

by Anonymousreply 6707/16/2011

R61. Landlines will eventually stop working during power outages depending on the length of the outage. Landline substations all have battery backups, but those backups don't last forever.

I used to live in Florida and went through Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne. We lost power for over a week after getting hit by both hurricanes. The phones stopped working a couple of days into the outage. Depends on how much battery backup is in your area.

During the same period some cell phones worked and others didn't. I was using Sprint at the time and my service was down a neighbor using Verizon had service.

The only land lines that will work when power is down are basic ones that only plug into a jack. Even more than 10 years ago very few people had basic phones.

No tech is perfect.

by Anonymousreply 6807/16/2011

[quote]then WHY would anyone pay a second bill for a landline that only works from one location?

because that one location is called "home" and the service is better, that's my reason.

by Anonymousreply 6907/16/2011

Read the whole thread & find out, r67. WHY should everyone repeat themselves just for you?

by Anonymousreply 7007/16/2011

R63, I started out as a big skeptic of cellphones, but the proof is all around us. Whether they're a "necessity" depends on how you define the word, but it'd be hard to argue that mobility isn't useful.

Today was a case in point for me. I got a ride to the airport. They don't allow waiting by the curb anymore, so I asked the guy who gave me the ride to circle around until I could call him to say that I'd checked in and everything was okay.

As it happened, the flight was cancelled. I called him, and he was there to pick me up within a few minutes. And I rebooked by calling them while he was driving me back home.

Could I have done all of this differently? Yes, but with a whole lot more difficulty. Cellphones have long ago proven their value. Whether or not constant texting and various smartphone apps have done so, or will ever do so, is another issue.

by Anonymousreply 7107/16/2011

I have been in many power outages over the course of living in eight different states.%0D %0D And NEVER during a power outage did my landline phone not work. The landline always worked during power outages.

by Anonymousreply 7207/16/2011

I have high speed internet on my existing land line.

I always have telephone and internet service when many of my friends and family do not.

by Anonymousreply 7307/16/2011

I havn't had one since 2003 (I'm 35). My parents and grandparents still have theirs. They'll probably never get rid of it. I only know one person under 40 who has one.

by Anonymousreply 7407/16/2011

True, R68, I believe it's about eight hours. Besides, at least at my house, the landline is connected to a cordless base station. So if the power goes out, I'm screwed anyhow. I keep forgetting to have a traditional telephone stuffed away in a drawer somewhere.

But that said, the landline network is pretty damn rock solid. One application that could be implemented easily would be touch-tone voting via traditional landline.

It is extremely difficult to hack into landlines. The network is probably as secure as the average bank vault, if not more so, wouldn't you agree?

by Anonymousreply 7507/16/2011

R72 have you ever been in a power outage that has lasted more than several days? They do eventually stop working. Short outages they will work because the landline companies all have stuff on battery or generator backup. In a serious distastor they will go out.

by Anonymousreply 7607/16/2011

I feel stupid for keeping mine because I feel like I'm throwing money away (though I switched from the phone co to the "triple play" from my cable company and brought down the cost some).

But I have two reasons: a power outage, as previously mentioned, and an unwillingness -- and New Yorkers may understand this -- to give up my 212 number.

by Anonymousreply 7707/16/2011

your so Carrie Bradshaw r77

by Anonymousreply 7807/16/2011

R49 I worked for 9 years for a landline company and 4 for a cell phone company and would agree landlines are much more reliable.

That said I no longer have a landline. Haven't used one in over 6 years.

by Anonymousreply 7907/16/2011

R74, you have a limited circle. Wireline replacement is much higher among the young, but not nearly as high as you think. Adults under 30 are split 50-50, i.e., half live without wireline. At the 40-year mark, only about one-third; because this includes the under-30s, it means that maybe one-quarter of 40-year-olds are without wireline.

This is indicative of a point I made over and over as a telecom analyst (for a Wall Street firm): Telecom does change, but not as fast as a lot of people want to assume.

Small example: The last party line phone in America was removed from Massachusetts in 1998.

Another example, bigger: You probably don't notice them, but there are telephone company manholes (ahem) all over the place. Underneath, there are little rooms under the street with metal racks full of what PC users would recognize as computer cards. Each one of them controls a telephone lines. I guarantee that if you could get access, you'd find a whole lot of line cards down there that were manufactured in the 1970s.

This stuff doesn't change nearly as fast as you think it does.

by Anonymousreply 8007/16/2011

R77, there is something called number portability. You can keep your 212 number if you switch to a cell phone.

by Anonymousreply 8107/16/2011

I inherited my parents land-line with their house.

Same phone number for 50 years and it's never gone down.

The power goes out at least four times a year here.

While I have cordless phones around the house, I also have one of these plugged in the guest room.

by Anonymousreply 8207/16/2011

[quote]But I have two reasons: a power outage, as previously mentioned, and an unwillingness -- and New Yorkers may understand this -- to give up my 212 number.

You shouldn't have to. I'm 95% sure that all phone numbers are now portable between wired and wireless, and that you have the right to take your old number (landline too) with you.

It's called "local number portability." However, the wireline-to-wireless side of it is fairly recent, and there are some wrinkles. So before you try it, you'll need to check it out further, maybe by calling the FCC.

by Anonymousreply 8307/16/2011

Correction

R81 = R49

by Anonymousreply 8407/16/2011

R68, a few years ago I had heard of some equipment that allowed people to use their regular home phone system over the cellular network.

You'd put your cellphone into a cradle on the base station while you were home, and it would route all traffic to and from your regular phones through your cell phone. So if you used, say, your cordless phone inside the house, you'd actually be talking on the cellular network, with the difference being that the form factor was more comfortable.

Disconnect the cell phone from the cradle, and the home phones would talk through the landline network. Or you could disconnect from the landline network and then this device would be just a tool to make your cordless phones an extension of your cellphone.

I really liked the idea, because it solved a couple problems: The inability to have telephone extensions with cellphones for family calls, and the hassle of using a cellphone around the house. Also, the device had a signal booster, which made cellular calls better.

I bought one and it didn't work. Two problems. First, the link between the cellphone and the base station was Bluetooth, which often introduces delay and garbling. Second, and much more important, was that the phone companies, which now control wireline and wireless within a single entity, hated it. They didn't want their wireline revenues disappearing.

The phone companies have huge leverage over the wireless handset makers, because every wireless handset is bought by the phone company then sold to the subscribe at a steep discount in return for a service contract obligation.

So I believe that the phone companies told the wireless handset makers to not make adapters available to the companies that made those base stations, and to otherwise not cooperate on improvements.

If that equipment existed, I'm sure I'd be wireless-only right now. All of this supports something else I'd tell clients: "Every telephone company of any kind is pure evil."

by Anonymousreply 8507/16/2011

The biggest reason we keep our landline is long distance. With friends and family scattered around the world, we have to have a good LD package. The one we have through Bell is fantastic. 1,000 free minutes anywhere in north america, and a very small per minute rate anywhere else. I also like being able to tuck the phone under my chin and walk around while doing other things. I know I could get a headset, but at the end of the day the quality of sound is much better.

by Anonymousreply 8607/16/2011

I don't get the arguments from the anti-cell people about not wanting to always be connected. They argue that by having a cell phone you are always connected.

People are connected as much as they chose to be connected and in some circumstances such as job situations as much as they are told to be connected.

Lat time I checked, my cell phone has an off button. I use it all the time. I don't keep my cell phone on at work. I turn it off when I don't want to be disturbed. It drives many of my friends crazy, but that is their issue, not mine.

Everybody has a choice as to how they use technology. It sounds like many of you are simply afraid of it or afraid you'll be one of those people who become so beholden to it that the tech run them versus them running the tech.

by Anonymousreply 8707/16/2011

[quote]I don't get the arguments from the anti-cell people about not wanting to always be connected. They argue that by having a cell phone you are always connected.

This reminds of something that happened before I retired. It was before smartphones linked to your e-mail. To do that, you needed to carry a separate Blackberry device, which was a 2-way pager with a keyboard.

So my company decided they'd give one to a handful of people deemed "important," and hook up their e-mail to forward things to the pager. I was in the "important" group (wow!) so they did it, and pretty soon I was just deluged with trivial crapola.

Three weeks into it, I sent a message telling people that if it was urgent, my secretary had my cellular number and would track me down, but that otherwise the Blackberry was going on the shelf and e-mails while I was traveling would have to wait until the end of the day when I could log in from my hotel.

A few years later, when I retired, I had to send the company-issued gadgets back to the headquarters. It was with much joy that I carefully picked up the Blackberry, coated with about a quarter-inch of dust, wrapped it in some Kleenex and put it in the Fed Ex pouch with other essentials.

You are only as connected as you'll allow other people to force you to be.

by Anonymousreply 8807/16/2011

p.s.: I was surprised they wanted it back, because it was obsolete by then. But it was a strange company about expenses. They wanted the Blackberry, but they didn't blink at the two bottles of wine for $650 and $400, or the $2,000 dinner for four. And when I pointed out that my international phone bill of $1,200 one month could've been cut to no more than $50 by changing carriers, they ignored me.

But they wanted that Blackberry back. Go figure!

by Anonymousreply 8907/16/2011

The use of telephone company provided land line service is at a historic low and it's not seen to be getting any better anytime soon.

The only thing saving most of the inside plant is that a lot of is acts as tandems for cell MTSO's.

And I've heard rumor that Verizon is looking to sell off their copper outside plant. Considering with a little bit of cleaning up of bridge taps and some cable maintenance you could probably push 100mbit service down a couple of pairs.

by Anonymousreply 9007/16/2011

R49/71, you had an emergency, you really needed to use your cell.

Most people yapping, or texting, on their their cell phones as they are walking down the street while bumping into people, and almost getting his by cars, are not on those phone due to any dire emergencies.

If most people used their phones for truly important calls, we wouldn't see so many yapping away. I can pretty much guarantee, that almost 90% of the people walking down the street blabbing on their cells are not in the middle of any sort of emergency phone call.

Corporations have created a need, consumers fell for it. What did you all do pre cells?

I also don't buy the argument a few others posted about cells having an Off button, that we have the choice to use it, really? How many of you keep your cell phone Off on a daily basis? I'm sure the percentage is extremely low, especially if you don't have a landline.

Most people fear they might miss 'something'.

by Anonymousreply 9107/16/2011

I'm seriously in love with R49. Are you well-hung?

by Anonymousreply 9207/16/2011

R87, you take this topic way too seriously and way too over-dramatically.

by Anonymousreply 9307/16/2011

R91 the off button is a choice. Nobody has a gun to your head making you keep your phone on all the time.

You are right people have a fear of missing something. The rest of the stuff such as texting, instant messaging, e-mail, Internet on your phone etc have all been manufactured and sold to us as needs in order for these companies to sell us their products and services. They got us hooked on using Internet services on our phone only to start capping the services so they can charge us more money. They create the "need" and get us hooked and then we can't live without these services.

Most people sheep and buy into this. People lived fine for years without any of this stuff.

by Anonymousreply 9407/16/2011

[quote]The use of telephone company provided land line service is at a historic low and it's not seen to be getting any better anytime soon.

Last time I looked, landline minutes were flat. But it's been a while. I was trying to find the numbers today, but couldn't. If you do, please post the link. It'd be especially interesting if accompanied by wireless minutes.

You need to remember that businesses are still on landline and will be for as far as anyone can see. But landline's certainly no growth business, that's for sure!

[quote]And I've heard rumor that Verizon is looking to sell off their copper outside plant.

All of the big landline guys have been doing that for quite a while, especially in secondary and rural areas.

[quote]Considering with a little bit of cleaning up of bridge taps and some cable maintenance you could probably push 100mbit service down a couple of pairs.

There's a regular long term capital replacement cycle, and Verizon and everyone else has been pushing fiber farther into the networks. This shortens the lengths of copper loops, and theoretically increases the potential data throughput.

As they've done it, they've re-engineered their networks in such a way as to be very anti-competitive. And the "backbone" ownership has been consolidated too. The whole vision of competition was destroyed early in George W.'s administration, and it's not going to return.

The Democrats are only slightly better on these issues. The media are a combination of weak, lazy, stupid, and corrupt, so they will provide no insight. Suffice to say that the rates for broadband in the U.S. are some of the highest in the industrial world, and the service quality is noticeably worse.

This is a big topic. My knowledge is very deep in the area, and it's hard to distill it. The short story is that the U.S. really blew it in the 1990s and the first half of the first decade. The phone companies were always evil and corrupt, and so are the Republicans, but I really didn't expect those "brave new Internet companies" of the mid- to late '90s to be so thoroughly fraudulent, nor did I expect all of the media and most of the regulators to be napping on the job.

Oh well!

[quote]I'm seriously in love with [R49]. Are you well-hung?

As a matter of fact, yes. And a top, for real, all the time.

by Anonymousreply 9507/16/2011

[quote]Most people yapping, or texting, on their their cell phones as they are walking down the street while bumping into people, and almost getting his by cars, are not on those phone due to any dire emergencies.

Since when was phone service for "dire emergencies" only? It wasn't that way in the pre-cellular era.

[quote]If most people used their phones for truly important calls, we wouldn't see so many yapping away.

Yeah, so what?

[quote]I can pretty much guarantee, that almost 90% of the people walking down the street blabbing on their cells are not in the middle of any sort of emergency phone call.

What's the matter, you never had a good day in your life?

[quote]Corporations have created a need, consumers fell for it. What did you all do pre cells?

I'd say they recognized a need, and filled it. Before cellular service, we used other means of communication.

[quote]I also don't buy the argument a few others posted about cells having an Off button, that we have the choice to use it, really? How many of you keep your cell phone Off on a daily basis?

I keep the ringer off about half the time. Inside my house, I have a cordless phone system tied to the landline. Two of the five ringers are off all of the time. When I go the bed, the landline gets forwarded to the cellphone, whose ringer is turned off. I am unreachable in the middle of the night.

[quote]Most people fear they might miss 'something'

That's what voicemail is for.

by Anonymousreply 9607/16/2011

I have a landline and just canceled my cell phone (also a VoiceStream alumnus) after 9 years. I am so happy to be rid of it.

by Anonymousreply 9707/16/2011

[quote]I keep the ringer off about half the time. Inside my house,

I don't have a landline, but my cell ringer is turned off over half of the time. Everyone who knows me knows that I don't treat my phone as an emergency-only device that I always answer, and they may get voicemail. But I do return calls.

[quote]I can pretty much guarantee, that almost 90% of the people walking down the street blabbing on their cells are not in the middle of any sort of emergency phone call.

So? No doubt you'd be offended by my daily habit of pulling out my phone as I leave work and calling my friend who has terminal cancer and checking in. As I walk down the sidewalk, he tells me whether there's anything he'd like me to pick up and bring over, whether he needs company that evening, and often just talks about some memory he's been thinking about. I'm sure R91 find this "blabbing" wasteful and needless because I'm not shrieking about an emergency.

Honestly, R91, why do you feel the need to traipse in to a thread and complain? I hope you find something in the world that makes you more happy than hating other people.

by Anonymousreply 9807/16/2011

[quote]Corporations have created a need, consumers fell for it. What did you all do pre cells?

Uh, before cell phones, we communicated. It just wasn't as convenient.

You're not too bright.

by Anonymousreply 9907/16/2011

My landline with Qwest has unlimited long distance. You can talk as much as want long distance and never get charged anything. %0D %0D You just pay a flat-rate for all local and all long distance. It's $38.00 per month.%0D %0D It is not by minutes.

by Anonymousreply 10007/17/2011

R98 is a nut case.

by Anonymousreply 10107/17/2011

R99, it is perfectly legitimate point of view by R94 that corporations have created a need for internet access in phones which people have bought into for texting by phone and emailing by phone - thereby creating a need and expanding the amount of money that corporations can rake in.

by Anonymousreply 10207/17/2011

"Since when was phone service for "dire emergencies" only? It wasn't that way in the pre-cellular era. "

"So? No doubt you'd be offended by my daily habit of pulling out my phone as I leave work and calling my friend who has terminal cancer and checking in. As I walk down the sidewalk, he tells me whether there's anything he'd like me to pick up and bring over, whether he needs company that evening, and often just talks about some memory he's been thinking about. I'm sure [[R91]] find this "blabbing" wasteful and needless because I'm not shrieking about an emergency.

Some of you here are insufferable.

Don't twist my words, I never said phone service was for dire emergencies. I said that cell phones were created for people who had to deal with emegencies, such as doctors etc.

As usual, the reading comprehension on DL is very poor. Talk about not being too bright R99!

I guess most in this thread you're too young to remember when only the very wealthy had the primitive forms of cell phones? Only doctors, lawyers, CEOs and basically people with extremely responsible jobs needed these phones. These types of phones were also in their cars.

Once again, no one truly NEEDS to be connected all day. Period. Sure you all communicated pre-cells, from home or from work. In an emergency, there were pay phones usually one on every corner.

Please don't bring up terminally ill friends and other made up stories, as the reason why people talk loudly on the street! You know full well that most people are talking trash on their phones everyday while going down the street, never looking at what or who they're walking into!

Besides the general rude aspect of talking loudly in public, I'm constantly forced to overhear inane arguments, what color eyeshadow some woman bought, how so and so at work is such a bitch, how some guy found out that his girlfriend is cheating etc. None of this is important.

ALL of these conversations can wait for the privacy of one's home. I could give a shit about others personal business.

The sheer fact that this rude behavior has become the norm, is very sad. It's just another aspect in the dumbing down of the human race and people's utter self absorption.

by Anonymousreply 10307/17/2011

Definitely the vast majority of people yapping into their phones on the streets and in public places are talking TRASH.%0D %0D I concur with R103.

by Anonymousreply 10407/17/2011

[quote]In an emergency, there were pay phones usually one on every corner.

Hey gramps, it's not 1980. Do try and keep up.

by Anonymousreply 10507/17/2011

The 'gramps' joke is very tired, overused, and not funny nor appropriate.

by Anonymousreply 10607/17/2011

[quote]Please don't bring up terminally ill friends and other made up stories, as the reason why people talk loudly on the street!

Wow, you are one nasty cunt. R91 was obviously talking about his own cell use, not giving reasons for the entire cell phone using population.

You just enjoy shitting on people, or what?

by Anonymousreply 10707/17/2011

I'm not a "gramps", I'm not even in my 50s, let alone old.

I simply can't stand the entire rudeness aspect which accompanies the usage of cell phones.

God forbid you are in a public place trying to get a moment of quiet! Even if you politely ask someone to please quite down, you'll usually be at the receiving end of some foul language.

I tried that once, some bitchy young woman told me to: "Go fuck yourself, I can talk as loud a as I want to! Fuck You!"

The next time such a person might even get violent.

I guess some of you in this thread call this technological progress?

by Anonymousreply 10807/17/2011

I have a landline, and need it. I need to go outdoors to get make or receive a call on my cellphone. I live in a rural county with only one stoplight in the entire county (very Mayberry).

I have Sprint now, but the service is the same with Verizon. It is even worse with T-Mobile and ATT (I've tried them all).

by Anonymousreply 10907/17/2011

I can't really waste money on both a cell and a landline, so I just have the cell, which I find far more useful than a landline.

All of the emergency situations I've ever encountered have belonged to other people and happened outside of my apartment. A landline wouldn't have been of much use in helping them.

by Anonymousreply 11007/17/2011

R107, you must be the "Shitting On Troll", you seem to use this line in many threads when people don't agree with you.

If you're not the "Shitting On Troll", find a new vocabulary to express your anger, you're tedious.

Stop defending others, I'm sure they're all big enough boys, that they can defend themselves!

by Anonymousreply 11107/17/2011

R111? Trot along dear. This is a thread about cell and landline phones, not your conspiracy theories.

by Anonymousreply 11207/17/2011

R112, I find R107 to be a complete loonie tunes wacko, so R111's statement is right on target.%0D %0D R107 makes no sense and sounds mentally disturbed, along with unjustified unnecessary anger issues and wildly inappropriate thinking.

by Anonymousreply 11307/17/2011

A storm took out the phone cable from the street up a hill to my home years ago. ATT blamed it on a tree on my property, which had fallen (it was ATT who had strung the wire through that tree) and wanted $500 to replace it. So I switched to Sprint mobile and am happy. A satellite dish provides TV and internet. The power line was fine, but I wish the power company would bury it. I miss the sound quality of a land line and that it worked during power outages, but do not miss ATT.

by Anonymousreply 11407/17/2011

56 and haven't had one for years. Cell phones are much more versatile and if you have one, why do you need a landline? Actually, I kept one for a while, thinking 911 could find me easier if I had an emergency and then I started thinking I was being too neurotic. I'd rather keep the money.

Do have Skype and some other junk related to Google but hardly remember how to use it when the time comes. Those are free and work through you're computer - you can hook up a camera and even see each other - but who the fuck cares?

by Anonymousreply 11507/17/2011

Any person I talk to on a cell phone from my landline, is almost always inaudible. They all use Droids and iPhones.

by Anonymousreply 11607/17/2011

I have a cell phone, not a landline. When I'm at home I sometimes vidchat with friends on Skype.

by Anonymousreply 11707/17/2011

R115, you ask why does one need a landline?%0D %0D One needs a landline so one can have long conversations with decent, sustained audio that does not fade in and out repeatedly, is not unclear when talking, is not full of static, and has excellent sound quality thruout the conversations.%0D %0D Landlines provide excellent sound quality rather than aggravating audio with various problems that detract from conversation.

by Anonymousreply 11807/17/2011

One, two, THREEEEEE! Three

by Anonymousreply 11907/17/2011

[quote]not on those phone due to any dire emergencies.

So? Who says you have to use it only in dire emergencies?

by Anonymousreply 12007/17/2011

[quote]I said that cell phones were created for people who had to deal with emegencies, such as doctors etc.

You didn't say that the first time around. But now that you've said it, here's my answer: You are flat wrong. Radiotelephones have been around for a long time. Cellular was nothing more than an elaboration of that concept, with a twist: Frequency re-use.

BTW, the first radiotelephones had their greatest popularity with the Mafia.

by Anonymousreply 12107/18/2011

I should have said that the first [quote]civilian[/italic] radio telephones were most popular with the Mafia. The military was the first application.

Here's another bit of trivia: One of the first and most important cellular patents was filed i 1942 by Heddy Lamar, the movie actress. It expired before cellular was commercialized.

by Anonymousreply 12207/18/2011

I keep a lot of twine in my house.

by Anonymousreply 12307/18/2011

Look what the servile tech-consuming zombies will be doing next - taking a pill for a password:

"This pill has a small chip inside of it with a switch. It also has what amounts to an inside-out potato battery. When you swallow it, the acids in your stomach serve as the electrolyte and power it up. And the switch goes on and off, and it creates an 18-bit ECG-like signal in your body and essentially your entire body becomes your authentication token.”

or getting a tattoo

"“This is a developmental system made by MC10. It has an antenna and some sensors embedded in it, and what we plan to do is work with them to advance a tattoo that could be used for authentication.”

how servile can you get? talk about 1984-Brave New World-Hitler. They'll be lining up for it, though...

by Anonymousreply 12407/11/2013

I like my land line with caller ID. It has clearer reception and reliable connection.

by Anonymousreply 12507/11/2013

I do 10+ hours of international calls per week. A landline is a must.

by Anonymousreply 12607/11/2013
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