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Dude (USA)

Can someone please explain the word 'dude' to me.%0D %0D Is it a kind of macho expression or do gays refer to each other as dude and what exactly does it imply.%0D %0D Someone posted here recently and implied he was 'straight acting' and kept using the word 'dude' as if to validate it.%0D %0D I have from time to time, when visiting the USA, been called 'dude' and I've always thought 'No, I'm not a dude, please don't call me that', but, really, I'm not in fact completely sure.

by British to the bone.reply 9805/05/2015

In all honesty, Oscar Wilde and his friends coined it to express 'attitude'.

by British to the bone.reply 105/05/2011

What do you think 'dude' means, OP?%0D %0D Here in Australia, it's just a friendly greeting, often by a male to males or females.%0D %0D Similar terms include: mate, buddy, etc.

by British to the bone.reply 205/05/2011

It is meaningless, as is most of what passes for conversation among those who use the word.

by British to the bone.reply 305/05/2011

It started out being used by surfers and skateboarders. aka people who get stoned a lot.

by British to the bone.reply 505/05/2011

Only used by cornpone trash. If someone calls you this, it is a signal to move in the opposite direction. Its like *awesome* or *what up G*. The U.S. mangles the Queen's English to the point where its unrecognizable.

by British to the bone.reply 605/05/2011

I think its slightly complimentary to be called a dude. In the 60's someone who was hip was a "cool dude" and I think it still implies that you're not a square or a loser.

I don't think it has anything to do with gay or straight.

by British to the bone.reply 705/05/2011

Dude looks like a lady!

by British to the bone.reply 805/05/2011

OP, Prince Harry's speech referred to his brother as "dude" one million times after the wedding. It seems you don't even know anything about your own culture, dude. "Dude" is not an American thing.

by British to the bone.reply 905/05/2011

The rug really tied the room together.

by British to the bone.reply 1005/05/2011

In the USA, dude can also be used towards a woman.

As an American, I'm a bit confused by this greeting. To me, as a person who grew up in an upper middle class area of Manhattan, 'dude' to me has always had a greaser or low class connotation.

I'm not in a demographic to use it or have anyone call me a dude.

by British to the bone.reply 1105/05/2011

Dude is the current "man". As a gay man I find it quite interesting the guys that will "dude" me. I have a colleague in his thirties who is quite the athlete and ladies man who always dudes me. I dude him right back in a wry, gay way. Believe it or not, when I was teaching in South Central LA, nigga was used in the exact same way. If you replace dude in Harry's speech with nigga, you get the ghetto version.

by British to the bone.reply 1205/05/2011

I don't know what you mean, bro.

by British to the bone.reply 1305/05/2011

When I was small, black people called each other "Jackson"

by British to the bone.reply 1605/05/2011

Often just a term indicating friendliness, or an invitation to jocularity.

Can also be used to "take the piss" out of someone. A pretentious statement can be shot down with a simple reply of "Dude." (Said in a low tone of voice, sometimes accompanied by a raised eyebrow.)

by British to the bone.reply 1705/05/2011

dude is like the British mate.

It's an affirmation that the people who talk to each other are on friendly terms. But the moment they no longer call each other dude (or use the word dude at least in every second sentence) they reached a serious crossroad where they either become lovers or mortal enemies.

by British to the bone.reply 1805/05/2011

"Dude" is the Mercun version of chavs using "mate".

by British to the bone.reply 1905/05/2011

I prefer "shawtie"

by British to the bone.reply 2005/05/2011

R12 and R17 and R19 are all correct. %0D %0D The word is used variously as meaningless filler (a substitute for, like, you know, a word like 'like'), as mild endearment, as irony, as comraderie, as disparagement, as emphasis, as exclamation, as substitute for Sir or Bubba or buddy or man or mate or guy, and in other ways besides, but for all the nuanced uses, it doesn't mean much at all.%0D %0D %0D %0D

by British to the bone.reply 2105/05/2011

It comes from California surf culture, as R5 said. It's used very generically now to mean the same as "guy." Its use says more about the speaker than the object. Any one can be a dude, but only certain types of people use the word dude. Some people use it ironically.

by British to the bone.reply 2205/05/2011

At one time, I believe it meant that you were getting a Dell.

by British to the bone.reply 2305/05/2011

I am a 39 year old woman, and a coworker (of the same age) called me dude last week. It was weird.

by British to the bone.reply 2405/05/2011

What is a mook?

by British to the bone.reply 2505/05/2011

West Coast usage is as a mild reproach / attention getter: "Dude, quit harshing my mellow", "Dude, you're blocking my wave", etc.

by British to the bone.reply 2605/05/2011

I have not been called dude yet. I am also a 39 year old female.

by British to the bone.reply 2705/05/2011

R26, I'm originally from SoCal and I only use it now to point out when someone's out of line, "Dude, you need to fucking deal with that shit on your own!"

by British to the bone.reply 2805/05/2011

Exactly, R28. "Dude" is a specific address to be used when a person is presumed to be ignorant of his/her impact upon his/her social, economic, or physical environment.

by British to the bone.reply 2905/05/2011

[quote]In the USA, dude can also be used towards a woman.

Which is so ridiculous.

by British to the bone.reply 3005/05/2011

Like "man" in the 60s and 70s it serves a social bonding purpose. It suggests "We're all in this together; we're on the same level; we belong to the same group/team/tribe/class"

Like "comrade" in the Soviet Union, but social rather than political.

It can be used in various ways depending on the tone. It can be serve as an endearment, a form of address, a synonym for a "person" (usually male) when the person's name is unknown, an exclamation or a reproach.

Variations: Buddy, Bro, Brah, G, nigga, etc.

All are used only in casual settings.

by British to the bone.reply 3105/05/2011

[quote]I am a 39 year old woman, and a coworker (of the same age) called me dude last week. It was weird.%0D %0D Tell her to stop it. Stop it at once!

by British to the bone.reply 3205/05/2011

R29 nails it.

I was getting frustrated with a work colleague recently and kept prefacing every sentence when speaking with him with "Dude." He called me on it: "Don't dude me." It's true. It's like beginning every sentence with the person's name. "Mark, I'm just trying to help. "Mark, why don't we..." It's patronizing.

by British to the bone.reply 3305/05/2011

[quote]"Mark, I'm just trying to help. "Mark, why don't we..." It's patronizing.%0D %0D A bit like thanking people all the time.%0D %0D 'Thank you, Mark!'%0D %0D 'Mark, would you.... thank you, Mark'.%0D %0D I once worked in a restaurant and the manager was always thanking me and using my name, without a smile, as she swished by.

by British to the bone.reply 3405/05/2011

*It's patronizing.*

No cunt, its trash.

by British to the bone.reply 3505/05/2011

That is only one of many uses, r33. The meaning is almost entirely dependent on context and tone.

by British to the bone.reply 3605/05/2011

r15, I agree as a greeting. However, well known responses are "nigga, you trippin' or nigga, you crazy."

I would love to hear Harry's speech dubbed.

by British to the bone.reply 3805/06/2011

Courtney Love offers Amanda Bynes some advice: "pull it together dude".

by British to the bone.reply 3905/29/2013

Dude, I know this TVC is more than 5 years old but it still makes me chuckle.

by British to the bone.reply 4005/30/2013

Dude....

by British to the bone.reply 4105/30/2013

It was NEVER from California surf culture. It was always valleyspeak derived from tobacco road.

by British to the bone.reply 4205/30/2013

I thought it's more a generational thing?

by British to the bone.reply 4705/30/2013

Hey dude, don't call me dude!

by British to the bone.reply 5105/30/2013

t

by British to the bone.reply 5209/09/2013

r23.....or you were looking for your car.

by British to the bone.reply 5309/09/2013

Calling someone "Man" is a bit friendlier than "dude."

"Dude" is ofetn used to insult of be patronizing such as, "Dude, you're an idiot, let me explain how it's really done."

by British to the bone.reply 5409/09/2013

The perfect definition of "dude" would be not R11.

by British to the bone.reply 5609/09/2013

Dude (USA) = Cunt (UK)

by British to the bone.reply 5809/09/2013

I've never heard it used that way, r60.

When someone says "Oh dude, I forgot cranberries" they're addressing someone as "dude". It could be their companion, their self or the voices in their head, but it's not a placeholder like "ummmm" or an interjection like "shit!"

It's a noun. It means "man".

It's really quite simple, dude.

by British to the bone.reply 6109/09/2013

I really haven't lost interest in "dude" yet. So many cute, dim hotties still use it. I have it quite a few more years.

by British to the bone.reply 6609/17/2013

OP, it is equivalent to "bloke".

Guess Brits can be as prissy as Americans.

by British to the bone.reply 6809/17/2013

Dude is more popular than ever, contrary to what some on here maintained a few years ago. I hear old people using it now.

by British to the bone.reply 6909/30/2013

d

by British to the bone.reply 7311/01/2013

d

by British to the bone.reply 7410/13/2014

Not to change the subject too much, but I get people calling me "boss," or "chief" all the time. It seems like it started with young, Hispanic guys addressing their superiors or elders, but it seems to have spread throughout the service industry, at least in southern California. Has anyone else been hearing those a lot?

by British to the bone.reply 7510/13/2014

We don't say "bloke"

by British to the bone.reply 7611/30/2014

r75, yeah dude. "Boss" is really big among urban youth, African American, Latin, and hip hop culture. It is a very respectful yet hip term. I love being called bossed by hot thuggish bros.

by British to the bone.reply 7712/01/2014

What is a "Dude Ranch"? My older, straight friends go on vacation to horse riding places and I always see that in the brochure.

Am I missing out?

by British to the bone.reply 7812/01/2014

Fictional dude ranch:

by British to the bone.reply 7912/01/2014

l0

by British to the bone.reply 8004/16/2015

OP must be old enough to remember Mott The Hooples' "All The Young Dudes" (Hey Dudes!). OP should properly be addressed as "Dowager Cuntess"

"Boss" gets traction from video game/ gaming culture. The main opponent to be challenged at different levels is a Boss. Thus, "boss fight", "______ like a Boss", etc

by British to the bone.reply 8104/16/2015

[quote]When I was small, black people called each other "Jackson"

Was Jack Benny your boss?

by British to the bone.reply 8204/16/2015

I smell mothballs in this thread.

by British to the bone.reply 8304/16/2015

Dude is a term used by straight men for each other. Nothing to do with gays. Straights say it to make you think they're "cool" and with it. Mainly used by the ignorant, low IQ pussy-gettin crowd. Don't use this in your communication with others. Just makes you look stupid.

by British to the bone.reply 8404/16/2015

America's 12 Bro-iest Neighborhoods, Ranked

Bros, kind of like obscenity, are hard to define. But we know 'em when we see 'em.

Maybe they were in a frat, maybe they weren’t. Maybe they work in investment banking, maybe they don't. All we're really certain of is that they don’t see graduating from college and having a job as a reason to not be doing shots on a Monday night (probably in one of these bars).

But where exactly are they doing these shots? While it’s easy to find bros when you're in school, once you get out it's a little harder. Luckily, though, they still tend to congregate -- like pledges to fraternity row -- in specific neighborhoods across the country. And these 12 'hoods attract the most.

by British to the bone.reply 8505/05/2015

r84, you're wrong, or just plain out of day. Bisexual and gay dudes say it all the time too. At least, the non-feminine mainstream ones.

by British to the bone.reply 8605/05/2015

So, do you live in a "bro" neighborhood, R86 (per R85)?

by British to the bone.reply 8705/05/2015

I do. I live in Clarendon. A lot of hot buff bros here, including a lot of bisexual ones. A lot of hot hipster bros running shirtless and in Under Armour shirts too.

by British to the bone.reply 8805/05/2015

It'S DOOD, dude!

by British to the bone.reply 8905/05/2015

R88, is there such a thing as a "hipster bro"? Most guys I know whom you'd consider bro-esque could not be more emphatic when they state "I am NOT a hipster."

by British to the bone.reply 9005/05/2015

It was spelled DEWD when I was young enough to be one. I wasn't one, of course.

by British to the bone.reply 9105/05/2015

how old are you?

by British to the bone.reply 9205/05/2015

Old enough to mock the use of the word.

by British to the bone.reply 9305/05/2015

r93, pretty old, man!

by British to the bone.reply 9405/05/2015

I'm not a huge fan of the word (though it's fine in things like The Big Lebowski) and I can't stand it when my fellow English people use it, it just sounds so wrong, like if an American saying "mate".

by British to the bone.reply 9505/05/2015

Without a doubt, R94. Without a doubt.

by British to the bone.reply 9605/05/2015

It is well used as a word of caution:

"oh, duude..." (aka "out of line!" or "are you sure?")

by British to the bone.reply 9705/05/2015

The word is flexible. As noted, the word is so ubiquitous now that people use it to mean virtually anything. It is often used a space filler, to fill in a pause.

by British to the bone.reply 9805/05/2015
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