Serving up this steaming pile of
Celebrity Gossip
Gay Politics
Gay News
and Pointless Bitchery
Since 1995

How do people die in a tornado?

Do they die from the fall? They must be conscious while they're being whirled around. It would sort of be like riding an amusement park ride. Is it after the tornado stops and they drop to the ground that they die? What if everyone wears a parachute to prepare for such an event. Then they would have a soft landing.

Sent from my iPhone

by Anonymousreply 9506/16/2013

Crushing or impact. Same with tsunami victims. Most don't drown but instead are crushed by debris.

by Anonymousreply 304/29/2011

they die of fright

by Anonymousreply 404/29/2011

A co-worker's parents were killed by a tornado several years ago. They were basically smashed flat by falling debris.

by Anonymousreply 704/29/2011

Let's limit the number of quotes from anyone going by the name "tater salad." TIA.

by Anonymousreply 804/29/2011

We need to start giving IQ tests to people who want to buy an iPhone.

by Anonymousreply 904/29/2011

They get overblown, OP.

by Anonymousreply 1004/29/2011

Some people die when they are tossed hundreds of yards and are found with multiple broken bones - some pulverized.

by Anonymousreply 1104/29/2011

OP = Plane Crash Death Troll looking for a side gig

by Anonymousreply 1204/29/2011

A better question might be how do some live through one?

by Anonymousreply 1304/29/2011

r13 after living in the South my whole life, the only Ive ever heard of is getting in a bathtub and pulling a mattress over it.

There is really nothing else you can do unless you have a storm cellar

by Anonymousreply 1504/29/2011

Many people down here are building safe rooms into their homes at the time of construction.

I've seen safe rooms under the stairs, off the master suite, off the garage, behind a decorative wall hanging, etc.

In many cases it is a reinforced steel chamber, made by another company, that the builder buys and builds around.

They are bolted to the floor.

There are also companies that make retrofit ones that are buried in your yard.

Google it.

by Anonymousreply 1604/29/2011

Why don't you people just pay for a basement?

by Anonymousreply 1704/29/2011

In many places the water table is too high. Areas than can have basements often do.

by Anonymousreply 1804/29/2011

Impact trauma, brain aneurism, shrapnel shreds them, fright,or some combination of the above. Not a pretty way to go but fairly quick.

by Anonymousreply 1904/29/2011

Along the Gulf you cannot have basements for reasons mentioned by R18. Where I live most people's houses are on stilts for flood purposes but that doesn't do much good in a tornado.

by Anonymousreply 2104/29/2011

OP there are lots of broken glass, nails and things flying around in those debris clouds and since they are lighter than humans the wind would slam them into the humans at a high rate of speed.

by Anonymousreply 2204/29/2011

OP, ask Dorothy, she would know.

by Anonymousreply 2304/29/2011

"William, get yer camera. You're going storm chasing with the guys from 4."%0D %0D "No."%0D %0D "I'm not joking."%0D %0D "Neither am I."

by Anonymousreply 2404/29/2011

Lot of misuse of the term "aneurysm". An aneurysm is a widening of a blood vessel that weakens the walls. You develop an aneurysm slowly. Having one doesn't harm you. The sudden, catastrophic event is the rupture of an aneurysm. John Ritter died of this. He developed an aneurysm because he had Marfan's syndrome.

by Anonymousreply 2504/29/2011

[quote]He developed an aneurysm because he had Marfan's syndrome.

Does Marfan mean "bad actor"?

by Anonymousreply 2604/29/2011

OP, I think you're describing what happens when people get raptured, not caught in a tornado.

by Anonymousreply 2704/29/2011

We know the IQ tests results of people who buy iPhones.%0D

by Anonymousreply 2804/29/2011

A house falls on them. Now go away before a house falls on you too.

by Anonymousreply 2904/29/2011

There is a LOT Of debris in that wind, OP. It's not like the movies.

A Tornado picks up EVERYTHING in it's path. A single tree is shredded a 100 of projectiles, houses broken up in thousands of shards, wood, metal,glass, concrete. "Dirt" is made of rocks, and concrete.

All that comes whirling at you in a a large mass 100s of mph.

Do you recall the video of the Tsunami and all it carried with it? It's like that but- in the air.

by Anonymousreply 3004/29/2011

I recall an incident that happened in central Illinois a few years ago.

A tornado was bearing down on a trailer park. Apparently ten people from the trailer park ran to a nearby bar which was housed in a two story 100 year old brick building. They hunkered down in the basement for safety. The tornado skipped the trailer park, hit the bar dead on, and everyone was killed.

by Anonymousreply 3104/29/2011

R31's story is a tragedy, but it's kinda funny at the same time.

by Anonymousreply 3204/29/2011

My neighbor Ned's son Rod was blown through the trunk of the tree in their front yard, but he was okay. Usually you just see a piece of straw lodged into a tree trunk.

by Anonymousreply 3304/29/2011

You get killed by debri, most unpleasant death.

by Anonymousreply 3404/29/2011

Did they ever find the kids, r2?

by Anonymousreply 3504/29/2011

[quote]You get killed by debri, most unpleasant death.

I can only imagine!

by Anonymousreply 3604/29/2011

They die from trauma...pretty much like in car accidents.

by Anonymousreply 3704/29/2011

Being in a tornado would make me mad dizzy, yo.

by Anonymousreply 3904/29/2011

How are the Republicans going to make up all those votes they lost?

by Anonymousreply 4104/29/2011

Oh, and by the way, I'm new in town. Nice to meet you!

by Anonymousreply 4204/29/2011

Many deaths are from flying debris

by Anonymousreply 4304/30/2011

I think flying debris wins so far.%0D %0D [quote]You develop an aneurysm slowly.%0D %0D Not always. I got one from being punched in the back of my head while being restrained by my shirt.%0D %0D Car accidents can cause them too.

by Anonymousreply 4404/30/2011

R40 must be a real BLAST at parties.

by Anonymousreply 4504/30/2011

One of my distant relatives in Oklahoma died from having a tornado push a stick through her head.

by Anonymousreply 4604/30/2011

Tornadoes give rise to grease fires and we all know how those end.

by Anonymousreply 4704/30/2011

Obviously this is not the place to get a serious answer. I was really looking for data on this question, not a Q&A room full of jokers.

by Anonymousreply 4805/11/2012

It really was no miracle, what happened was just this....

by Anonymousreply 4905/11/2012

I know one lady who died when a house got dropped on her. Then the rotten people in the town, instead of helping her, starting celebrating her death.

by Anonymousreply 5005/11/2012

Wow, this makes the volcanoes, earthquakes, tsunamis, bears, moose, exposure, drowning and serial-killer risks that I grew up with in Alaska actually tolerable. At least the above-mentioned are avoidable (except for the first three).

by Anonymousreply 5105/11/2012

Most tornado deaths are caused by head trauma. Before you pull that mattress over you in the bathtub, don your bicycle helmet.

by Anonymousreply 5205/11/2012

[quote]Its the twirling. The blood rushes to teh head causing an aneurism and then when the twirling stops they drop to the ground with a get thud thereby finishing the job. Its God's way of calling home his loved ones.

He must hate Stevie Nicks.

by Anonymousreply 5305/11/2012

Sad...

by Anonymousreply 5405/11/2012

This thread is useless without pictures.

by Anonymousreply 5505/11/2012

They stop breathing.

by Anonymousreply 5605/11/2012

I'll never forget reading about the 1974 tornado outbreak (the same one that spawned the Xenia tornado) and one victim had a cut on his leg around the ankle. The winds from the tornado were so powerful that the calf muscle was pulled out of the cut and wrapped around his ankle.

This same outbreak spawned an F5 tornado that passed within 1 mile of the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant in Alabama. This is one of the handful of nuclear plants that has the same style reactor as the Fukushima Plant, so one can imagine how devastating a direct hit from an F5 tornado would be.

It's also not the last time this nuke plant - which is sitting right in the middle of the tornado alley of the South - has had a near miss with a tornado. I think during last year's tornado outbreak, they lost their primary and secondary sources of power and were relying on their last resort - back-up diesel generators - for several days.

Imagine if a direct strike took out the diesel generators.

by Anonymousreply 5705/11/2012

[quote]My neighbor Ned's son Rod was blown through the trunk of the tree in their front yard, but he was okay.

But what of Tod?

What of Tod?!?!?

by Anonymousreply 5805/11/2012

[quote]they lost their primary and secondary sources of power and were relying on their last resort - back-up diesel generators - for several days.

Methinks those idiots ought to look into setting up tertiary and quatrary [sp?] sources of power, seeing as how the same thing that knocks out primary usually takes out the secondary option at the same damn time.

by Anonymousreply 5905/11/2012

SLUNG OUT LIKE ON A SLING SHOT

by Anonymousreply 6006/03/2013

R8, don't you be hatin' on the TATER!

by Anonymousreply 6106/03/2013

I know a guy who was actually IN a tornado. It was in Windsor Locks NY a long time ago. Coincidentally, I drove down the same road a day after. (Long before I met him.) He said he was following an 18-wheeler onto an entrance ramp when the wind came up and the truck slowed in front of him. Then the truck began to move side to side in the wind, and finally, it went over. The guy said he turned off the ignition on his Bronco and got down on the floor. All the windows in the car blew out and he had this sensation of being in the air. He said he could see the dirt particles flying through the broken windows. When he got out, his car was resting in the V of the jackknifed trailer that had been in front of him. He walked to a donut shop across the street and they asked him if he knew what just happened to him. He said he didn't. They told him his car lifted up about 15 feet in the air and was spinning around in circles before it dropped back down to the ground.

Yikes.

by Anonymousreply 6206/03/2013

I have had my mind spun around in space.

by Anonymousreply 6306/03/2013

Typically, their eyeballs get sucked out and they shoot blood out of the sockets for several feet.

Heavy flow out of each.

by Anonymousreply 6406/03/2013

[quote]Many people down here are building safe rooms into their homes at the time of construction.

My husband is having one put in the garage floor. I've attached a picture of what it is supposed to look like. Lovely, isn't it?

We live only a few miles away from Moore, and I know our town has a better than 75% chance of being blown to smithereens by a supercell mesocyclone within the next two years. However, if it's a choice of facing a F5 barreling down the road or climbing into a hole that resembles a purchase from Mausoleums-R-Us, I'll chance standing outside. At least there will be someone who can help the first responders dig my husband out of the garage.

by Anonymousreply 6506/03/2013

OP, is that you Umpy?

by Anonymousreply 6606/03/2013

What happened to the cow that was lifted into the air by the tornado?

by Anonymousreply 6706/03/2013

There was that teen in Joplin. He was coming home from his high school graduation. He was lifted (sucked out from the force of the tornado) out of the sun roof of his car. They found his body about five or six blocks away.

by Anonymousreply 6806/03/2013

Toto and I weathered our tornado just fine. Luckily Uncle Henry and Auntie Em built a strong, fine house. Our impact was somewhat lessened due to us landing on a lady with peppermint stripe socks. She gave her life to save poor Toto and me.

by Anonymousreply 6906/03/2013

[quote] Why don't you people just pay for a basement?

Most are too cheap but a lot of them believe the contractors who lie to them and tell them the water table is too high, the ground is too hard packed, the clay is too heavy, there's bedrock down there, etc. The contractors tell them this because they don't know how to build basements.

In one day, I heard "experts" on cable "news" channels declare that in OK City alone, the water table is too high, the ground is hard packed clay that will cave basement walls in, there's too much limestone, and there's bedrock down there. What an extraordinary place, to have so many geological features in one small area!

On those same "news" channels, on that same day. I heard several people say that they went into their basements or their underground storm shelters in the back yard to take cover from the same tornado in the same area around OK City. How clever of those people to be able to build underground shelters in watery bedrock clay!

by Anonymousreply 7006/03/2013

They die of heat protestation, Rose!

by Anonymousreply 7106/03/2013

I don't believe in tornadoes.

by Anonymousreply 7206/03/2013

Well, R65, two teens and their family members went into one of those shelters and did fine. In fact, they filmed a bit of tornado video from it with an iPhone.

And you do know first responders comb stricken areas to find survivors buried under their houses, right? It's what they do for a living. So far, nobody has found the bones of tornado survivors trapped in a shelter while excavating a neighborhood a year later.

by Anonymousreply 7306/03/2013

[quote]How do people die in a tornado?

That's easy: they didn't have guns to shoot at the funnel cloud!

by Anonymousreply 7406/03/2013

How does being in the basement prevent you from being sucked up?

by Anonymousreply 7506/03/2013

This post and the OP are right up there with the where should I live in Africa thread.

by Anonymousreply 7606/03/2013

There are no words, R75.

by Anonymousreply 7706/03/2013

Link, R31?

by Anonymousreply 7806/03/2013

Why do people even live there, deem it uninhabitable and move on.

by Anonymousreply 7906/03/2013

Seeking shelter in a walk-out basement isn't of much help.

Lots of finished basements nowadays have windows, doors and sliders. They make the basement nicer but don't offer a lot of protection if a strong tornado passes over.

by Anonymousreply 8006/03/2013

You are no help, r77.

by Anonymousreply 8106/03/2013

R31:

Trailer Trash Guy#1: We'll be safe if we hunker down here!

Trailer Trash Guy #2: Yeah! Gimme a beer!

Trailer Trash Guy#3: Me too! I want one! This was a great idea! This will be fun!

Trailer Trash Guy #1: Hey...what's that noise?

Trailer Trash Guy #2: What the fuck?

Trailer Trash Guy #3: Oh my GOD! That tornado done followed us here!

Trailer Trash Guy #1: HOLY SHIT!

(ceiling is ripped of, tornado bears down on the trailer trash, who look up with mouths agape, beers in hand. The bloody, decapitated bodies of the trailer trash are hurled about the debris and carnage)

LMAO!

by Anonymousreply 8206/03/2013

OP, here is a link to pictures of a tornado victim. Not too hard to imagine what could have happened.

by Anonymousreply 8306/03/2013

No tornado carnage stories this week? Damn. :(

by Anonymousreply 8406/15/2013

I never understood why you just can't outrun a tornado. It's not like you can't see it coming toward you. I think too many people just panic and freeze in place. Feets don't fail me now!!!

by Anonymousreply 8506/16/2013

r85, I would think a tornado would move faster than someone could run. Plus, they are unpredictible as to which direction they will go.

by Anonymousreply 8606/16/2013

My mother was killed in a tornado here in Kansas. She was impaled by the tailpipe of a car that blew through the kitchen window. It went through her and into the wall. I found her standing there, backed up against the sink. I stood there wondering why she had such a shocked look on her face, and then I saw this pipe sticking out like three feet. I couldn't understand what had happened - I thought a tree limb had broken the window and she was made about it.

I couldn't write when this thread first started, but I've had a lot of therapy. But I still get sick when I see smoke coming out of the back of a car or even when I see a downspout with water running out of it. Because of what was happening when I finally looked at that pipe.

by Anonymousreply 8706/16/2013

It really was no miracle....what happen was just this. The wind began to blow....the house to pitch...and suddenly the hinges started to ...unhitch....then suddenly the witch.....

by Anonymousreply 8806/16/2013

r87, I'm so sorry.

by Anonymousreply 8906/16/2013

[quote]There was that teen in Joplin. He was coming home from his high school graduation. He was lifted (sucked out from the force of the tornado) out of the sun roof of his car. They found his body about five or six blocks away.[/quote]

His name was Will Norton. He was actually found only a few yards away in the nearby pond. But it took almost a week to find him because the pond was covered with so much debris. I was fascinated by his story at the time, and watched his YouTube videos, which are still up. It was sad 'cause he was such a happy, animated person. I think he may have been gay. His family is very religious, but he was going to go to film school in California and I think he would've eventually come out there.

by Anonymousreply 9006/16/2013

Sally won an Oscar for her tornado film. Why didn't I do a farm movie that year?

by Anonymousreply 9106/16/2013

Further to R90's link to Will Norton's YouTube videos, here is a video that Will's sister posted two weeks after the tragedy, describing exactly what the family went through during the tornado and immediately afterwards.

This will answer OP's question - and will also wipe the smile off the face of anyone but the most determined, pissy trolls here.

by Anonymousreply 9206/16/2013

OP, as a friend of Dorothy, you should know.

by Anonymousreply 9306/16/2013

Mostly from flying debris.

by Anonymousreply 9406/16/2013

You go into the basement because it's typically under ground and has no windows. Mine is cinderblock and it's not going anywhere.

The basement is safe because, in theory, there are no windows to break and it's lower than the ground so you're under the debris field. In the event the house collapses on you, the subfloor *should* hold up leaving you cocooned.

That's why most people in tornado areas keep water, flashlights, first aid kits and a battery operated radio in the basement. Or you have that stuff handy to grab if you hear the sirens going off.

It's just a fact of life in some areas.

(R87, I'm sorry about your mom - that's horrible).

by Anonymousreply 9506/16/2013
Loading
Need more help? Click Here.