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''He doesn''t suffer fools gladly''.

I always find this to be such a strange form of praise.%0D %0D I mean, who does? Surely it would be a much bigger compliment to say that a very clever person is very patient with people less clever than himself. He's never patronising or superior to anyone.%0D %0D But, no, 'he doesn't suffer fools gladly' is supposed to be some great tribute to a person's personality.%0D %0D

by Anonymousreply 5705/16/2014

I don't think it's ever meant as a tribute. I think it's used to rationalize someone's hostile behavior towards others. Sort of like saying "he broke a lot of hearts" translates to "he's a big old slut."

by Anonymousreply 103/03/2011

It is rarely used as a compliment, OP

by Anonymousreply 203/03/2011

It's a dumb phrase, but a lot of people gladly eat up BS.

by Anonymousreply 303/03/2011

I tend to irritate these poor people on sight.

by Anonymousreply 403/03/2011

I've never gotten along with those types of people.

by Anonymousreply 503/03/2011

I think it's considered faint praise. I've seen it used on DL to describe Martha Stewart (somebody worked for her).

by Anonymousreply 603/03/2011

I see what you mean, R's 1 & 2.%0D %0D It's just that recently my brother said it about his, frankly, stupid wife, as if to say, she's a very smart lady and just doesn't have time for fools.%0D %0D Similarly I read an article about some actress and it was used to imply the same thing.

by Anonymousreply 703/03/2011

Sorry, R7 = OP.

by Anonymousreply 803/03/2011

Please don't use such a cliched phrase.

[quote]Suffer-fools-gladly, a malleable euphemism, carries a rich load of ambiguity. Everyone who uses it means something different, and readers take from it whatever they choose. If it's said often enough about the same person, we may guess it's an oblique attack. It suggests that the subject is brusque to the point of rudeness, uncaring about the feelings of others, given to rages when crossed. Often it's an attempt to avoid risking offence while describing someone totally disagreeable.

by Anonymousreply 903/03/2011

I've always been stumped by the phrase, "takes no prisoners." I used to think it meant capturing people and then having a change of heart and letting them go. I still don't really get it.

by Anonymousreply 1003/03/2011

I'm pretty sure the phrase is meant to describe someone who does not put up with sycophants or sycophantic behavior.

The term fool comes from the job of court jester, someone who was meant to tell the king what he wanted to hear and keep him amused. We use the term fool nowadays to describe anyone who is an idiot or does idiotic things, but that's not what the term originally meant.

So, when I hear the phrase, it seems to me (or SHOULD seem) that the person is irritated by "yes" men who tell you whatever they think you need to hear.

by Anonymousreply 1103/03/2011

"Takes no prisoners" refers to someone who will slaughter their own mother to get what they want. Literally, in the past there were some opposing forces who were so vicious, they would kill every man woman and child in a village. They took no prisoners.

Get it?

by Anonymousreply 1203/03/2011

Takes no prisoners - wouldn't that mean to make sure there are no prisoners left to take

by Anonymousreply 1303/03/2011

Russell Crowe's past bloviating about his inability to suffer fools gladly should tell you all you need to know, OP.

by Anonymousreply 1403/03/2011

'I used to think it meant capturing people and then having a change of heart and letting them go.'%0D %0D That's so funny.%0D %0D I don't know what the fuck it means either.

by Anonymousreply 1503/03/2011

but R14, Crowe is using the term because he THINKS he sees through bullshit, when in reality he's just an asshole.

by Anonymousreply 1603/03/2011

Op, I think you have the meaning wrong. I thouhgt it meant that the person is not naive.

by Anonymousreply 1703/03/2011

OP, I have always thought it meant someone who doesn't put up with bullshit from someone. A person who will call out someone who is being obnoxious or rude or annoying. A person who will let you know that he or she is "on to you" in some situations. I don't think it specifically means someone who is an asshole or unkind, either.%0D %0D It means that someone is smart and observant and NOT a pushover or a "shrinking violet." Someone who will NOT be taken advantage of. It means DON'T FUCK WITH ME.%0D %0D I consider it a compliment. There are a lot of fools who post here on DL. Sometimes I eviscerate them. Sometimes I simply scroll past and cannot be bothered.

by Anonymousreply 1803/03/2011

"Doesn't suffer fools gladly" = I'm middle-aged and haven't yet learned to control my temper when things don't go my way.

by Anonymousreply 1903/03/2011

I'm bumping this to see if anyone else has anything more to say about 'these fools'.

by Anonymousreply 2003/07/2013

It's not a compliment OP. Politely it means someone who thinks they know better grow impatient with their perceived inferiors.

by Anonymousreply 2103/07/2013

[quote]I always find this to be such a strange form of praise. I mean, who does?

Jay Leno

The Beltway press

The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences

Paula Deen

by Anonymousreply 2203/07/2013

Someone who knew Dionne Warwick very well told me that she didn't suffer fools gladly.

That is code for "she's a bitch on wheels".

by Anonymousreply 2303/07/2013

"Doesn't suffer fools gladly" is more of a caution or warning than a compliment, no?

by Anonymousreply 2403/07/2013

But surely, to say it of an idiot, is holding the idiot in higher esteem than she deserves?

by Anonymousreply 2503/07/2013

I've had it said about me any times (and I fear it is true, though I also often think I suffer them more gladly than I might--if only they knew what I was really thinking). I agree, not meant as a compliment--sometimes not an insult, but a warning.

by Anonymousreply 2603/07/2013

I always figured it was a compliment. It's never said about me because I'm more of a "shrinking violet". I'm shocked to see so many people think it means asshole. I mean if someone else is being an asshole by virtue of being a "fool" why should another person put up with the "fools" bullshit?

by Anonymousreply 2703/07/2013

It refers to someone who is impatient or rude to those who aren't as bright or with it as they believe themselves to be. Really not a compliment. Its someone who doesn't worry about hurting someone elses feelings and is likely to be bluntly honest and brusque.

by Anonymousreply 2803/07/2013

[quote] "Takes no prisoners" refers to someone who will slaughter their own mother to get what they want. Literally, in the past there were some opposing forces who were so vicious, they would kill every man woman and child in a village. They took no prisoners.

If only 'I took no prisoners'

by Anonymousreply 2903/07/2013

When someone says to me the phrase " I don't suffer fools gladly " , I like to reply " how can you stand living with yourself "

by Anonymousreply 3004/20/2013

It simply means someone who doesn't take shit.

It's definitely meant as a compliment.

by Anonymousreply 3104/20/2013

[quote]Politely it means someone who thinks they know better grow impatient with their perceived inferiors.

Not perceived.

by Anonymousreply 3204/20/2013

It means "Unable to feign an undeserved patience with the stupid and incompetent."

by Anonymousreply 3304/21/2013

Euphemism for "He is an asshole," often meant as an excuse for the shitty manners of "superior" talents.

by Anonymousreply 3404/21/2013

I think it's bizarre r9 wants us to take an editorial from Robert Fulford, a conservative Canadian journalist who supported the Iraq War, from The National Post, a conservative Toronto newspaper, as the last word on the subject.

I reject his authority, r9, and yours.

by Anonymousreply 3504/21/2013

OP, go off and die. you are the type of illiterate "fool" I have no time for.

by Anonymousreply 3604/21/2013

If only r36 were the boss of anyone, let alone the OP!

by Anonymousreply 3704/21/2013

I am suffering you ungladly, OP.

by Anonymousreply 3804/21/2013

It is not a tribute. It is saying that he is impatient with foolishness. He does not suffer fools gladly - he won't put up with them.

by Anonymousreply 3906/11/2013

And yet, pompous corporate types say it about themselves all the time R39.

by Anonymousreply 4006/11/2013

"I always find this to be such a strange form of praise. I mean, who does? Surely it would be a much bigger compliment to say that a very clever person is very patient with people less clever than himself."

"who does"? You said it yourself, very clever people.

by Anonymousreply 4106/11/2013

Cliché to be avoided at all cost!

by Anonymousreply 4206/11/2013

[quote]It is not a tribute. It is saying that he is impatient with foolishness. He does not suffer fools gladly - he won't put up with them.

This seems to be the best response...but it's still sort of praise because you're saying he's smarter than all the fools he's impatient with.

by Anonymousreply 4305/06/2014

I don't see what is wrong with not suffering fools. There are a lot of ignorant idiots out there who can be tiresome to deal with. Not everyone has the patience to put up with it and most people tend to be quite stubborn and not accept when they are being foolish anyway.

by Anonymousreply 4405/06/2014

There are lots of phrases like this. They're usually holdovers from a bygone era, and were a way of saying something unpleasant euphemistically.

"He doesn't suffer fools gladly" = "He's an impatient asshole"

"He's no better than he needs to be" = "He's a whore who treats his conquests badly"

"He's not exactly a rocket scientist" = "He's the next closest thing to retarded"

by Anonymousreply 4505/06/2014

R40 is right. Both "take no prisoners" and "doesn't suffer fools" are used as compliments in the corporate world.

by Anonymousreply 4605/06/2014

OP, I know MANY who put up with all sorts of nonsense, quite gladly, for promotions and other perks.

by Anonymousreply 4705/06/2014

It's often used to describe major cunts / assholes. Even smart people do foolish things, so it's ridiculous to applaud someone for treating others like shit.

by Anonymousreply 4805/06/2014

[quote][R40] is right. Both "take no prisoners" and "doesn't suffer fools" are used as compliments in the corporate world.

Not uniformly.

Only assholes compliment other assholes on being assholes.

by Anonymousreply 4905/06/2014

I always find it best to avoid cliches like the plague, r42.

by Anonymousreply 5005/06/2014

It's the superior tone of it that grates. As if the rest of us actually do suffer fools gladly, and therefore should admire and aspire to be like the object of the cliche.

It just makes the user of the cliche look like an idiot. Multiply that by a thousand if they're using it about themselves.

by Anonymousreply 5105/06/2014

I always thought this saying was stupid and made no sense.

by Anonymousreply 5205/06/2014

I've been told I don't suffer fools gladly..

Really what it is - I'm not going to put up with the lack of common sense and absolute stupidity. Like, people not working hard at their job, people smoking on buses, trains that explicitly say do not smoke. etc.

I believe it to be a compliment actually - with the stupidity we find in this world - I don't have time for people that are not considering the environment around them.

I'm not about to sit there and listen to a teenager swear up and down in front of a family of children and watch their mother be obviously uncomfortable. At the end of the day - i hold a standard for myself to act accordingly and in a sensical manner - I will hold that to other people as well.

by Anonymousreply 5305/16/2014

Why sensical and not rational? You some kind of spiritualist craphead?

by Anonymousreply 5405/16/2014

Usually, when I hear this in conversation, it's said as a warning, i.e., "take care not to come across as a fool, because if you do, this person will shoot you down (or shut you out) without mercy."

by Anonymousreply 5505/16/2014

In used to "not suffer fools", but now I suffer them pretty well if they're not hateful. It seems a lot kinder and also more productive, partly because it opens you up to maybe provide an example to the folks in question, and partly because I've had a few foolish moments of my own.

by Anonymousreply 5605/16/2014

The weird thing is I work with a bunch of men who you could use this phrase for, and they're all assholes.

But I work with a woman whom this phrase was basically written for, and she's not an asshole. She just has very high standards; but everyone likes her.

by Anonymousreply 5705/16/2014
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